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Today's Opinions

  • Saddened by state of the country

    It is a very sad time in our country when people who really care about the community are gunned down and killed; from a 17 year veteran firefighter in California to five senior staff members of a newspaper in Maryland.
    Rejects of society who have a life of misery bring it upon innocent souls that cause pain and tears.
    If it’s not police officers, it’s firefighters or bystanders. Gun violence seems to be an everyday occurrence in our society, where losers run amok and who do not care for anything.

  • Impressed by ‘Completely Hollywood’ performance

    The July 15 presentation of “Completely Hollywood” at the Carol Jane Waddell Outdoor Galax Theater Guild stage was excellent.
    Presented by the Arts Council of the Twin Counties and directed by Stephannie Dees, the young and excellent performers were Wesley Harmon, 16, Molly Sullivan, 15, Daphne Utt, 18, and RJ Baber, 18 (sound and lights) of [The Wandflower Theatre].
    The show was delightful, well done and funny with great humor, great props and impeccable timing.
    Bravo.

    Cameron A. Gillespie, MD
    Galax

  • The killing of a community

    Who can stand the odor, flies, and noise coming from the “cattle feedlot” that was built on top of the community of the old historic community of Speedwell?
    It was always a farm but it never had a concentration of almost 10,000 cattle. An old farm purchased by someone who does not live there, several years ago, turned into a huge feedlot overlooking our community.

  • Clarks thanked for community service

    Editor’s note: Susan Clark has retired as director of the Galax Department of Social Services; her husband, Rick Clark, has announced his retirement as Galax police chief later this year.

    One of the many things I have always admired about Susan Logan Clark and Rick Clark is their overwhelming commitment to serve others. Without consideration of personal consequence on their time or other priorities, they always show up with self-effacing grace, lessen others’ loads and do the right thing.
    They were born contributors.

  • Road closing causes problems

    Note: The following letter is a response to a letter that appeared in the June 11 edition of The Gazette.
    I appreciated the Sturgills writing about the illegal closing of old public roads. As mentioned in the letter, I was threatened by one of the owners. They had posted a camera along the trail and had a picture of me on my horse. They got word to me that if I came again, they would report me to the sheriff for trespassing.

  • Volunteers needed for campaign

    Now that Anthony Flaccavento has been chosen in the recent primary by voters in Grayson, Independence, Carroll, Galax and all the other localities in our 9th Congressional District, to be a candidate on the November ballot, we need as many volunteers as possible to help get information out to voters.
    If you are interested in sending a working person from our region to be our real representative in Congress, and could spare a little time now and then as a volunteer, please email me at sjrflacisback@gmail.com.
    Scott Jackson-Ricketts
    Independence

  • Silence reveals moral bankruptcy

    Morgan Griffith’s latest newsletter is devoted to the opioid crisis. In it, he touts the bills that he has introduced and supported to deal with the crisis and how he has worked with Democrats to move these bills forward.
    I guess it is better late than never that our delinquent congressman is doing this, but I suspect this latest activity has a lot to do with the fact that he has a credible opponent, Anthony Flaccavento, in the next election, and he figures that he just better get something done for the Ninth District.  

  • Closing Baywood a tough decision, but necessary

    Much debate surrounds the Grayson County School Board’s recent decision to close Baywood Elementary.

    The matter passed with a 3-2 vote on June 18, weeks after the school board and Division Superintendent Kelly Wilmore explained that the decision was forced on them due to an anticipated $1 million shortfall in the upcoming school year.