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Education

  • Shortage may lead to Baywood School closure

    INDEPENDENCE — In a statement on social media to parents on Wednesday evening, Schools Superintendent Kelly Wilmore announced that their budget’s shortfall for the 2018-19 school year, in addition to other factors, has led the schools to consider one of three options, the most probable of the three being to close Baywood Elementary School before the beginning of the 2018-19 school year.
    The other proposed options were to close Fairview Elementary School, or to cut seven positions and seven programs at the Career and Technical Education (CATE) Center. 

  • CCHS seniors take next step

    HILLSVILLE – Many young minds began the next chapter in the book of their lives last Saturday, as 267 students from the Carroll County High School class of 2018 turned over their tassels, receiving diplomas in various areas of studies.

    The commencement opened with a greeting from CCHS student body co-presidents and a celebration of “hard work, dedication and the countless hours of development, growth and prosperity through education at CCHS,” as described by Co-President Houston Elizabeth Dixon.

  • Adams-Parker named Carroll assistant schools superintendent

    HILLSVILLE — Dr. Beverly Adams-Parker has been named assistant superintendent of Carroll County Public Schools effective July 1.

    Carroll Schools Superintendent Dr. Shirley Perry the school system will have two assistant superintendents, with Dr. Mark Burnette continuing in his position. “These positions will have different responsibilities and duties,” she said.

  • Grayson supervisors devise school budget plan

    By LARRY CHAMBERS and SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff

    INDEPENDENCE – As the Grayson school system faces a $1 million dollar shortfall in revenue due to loss of student funding and an increase in insurance costs, the supervisors are devising a plan to meet the school board’s request for the county to contribute more than the minimum it its required to provide.

  • Galax receives $17.1M for school renovation

    The City of Galax received a $17.1 million loan from the U.S. Department of Agriculture last week, to be used for the Galax Elementary School project.

    Of that total, $100,000 is for covering legal fees, consultant fees, advertising for the project and any other related costs, said City Manager Keith Barker.

    Coram Construction of North Carolina originally submitted a bid of $17.8 million; but with additional fees, including those listed above, the final amount was just shy of $20 million.

  • Campbell named teacher of the year

    INDEPENDENCE — Independence Middle School Coach Charles Campbell was named the 2018 teacher of the year for the Grayson County Public Schools district, during a ceremony held May 14 at the GCHS auditorium.

    Before the board’s regular monthly meeting, Campbell and seven other instructors were honored for their contributions to the school system during the 2017-18 school year.

  • Once homeless, Galax woman overcomes odds to graduate

    Submitted by Jill Ross & Katherine Asbury

    Wytheville Community College

    Statistically speaking, she shouldn’t even be in college. It should have been almost impossible. After all, children who’ve been in foster care as teenagers have about a 3 percent chance of ever earning a college degree.

    But Destiny Moody refused to be another statistic. In fact, she’s defied the odds most of her life.

    On Saturday, she did it again.

  • Galax names three to school board

    Two new members will join a returning incumbent on the Galax School Board on July 1, when new terms begin.

    Galax City Council requested letters of interest from citizens who wanted to fill the three spots, conducted interviews and recently announced the appointees.

    Ray Kohl, who serves as chairman currently, was reappointed for a another three-year term.

  • Lockdown drills prepare officers for the worst

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County public school system has partnered with local law enforcement in recent years to further develop and strengthen security measures for students’ well-being.

    In the interest of being prepared for worst case scenarios, a plan of action for any and all threats are consistently discussed. Such was the case for a recent lockdown drill that was held by the county’s tactical team at Grayson County High School.

  • Supervisors question school spending plan

    INDEPENDENCE — Trust issues and spending questions became topics of a joint budget work session April 26 between the Grayson County Board of Supervisors and the Grayson County School Board.

    While supervisors asked for a more detailed breakdown of spending, school officials argued that they’ve proven the school system has been responsible with public money.