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Music & Arts

  • Eddie Bond wins NEA Heritage Fellowship award

    FRIES — Acclaimed fiddler Eddie Bond of Fries is among the recipients of the prestigious 2018 National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.

    Bond, a lifelong resident of Grayson County, grew up in the heart and capital of old-time music.

  • GHS presents classic musical "Grease"

    The ‘50s-sendup musical “Grease” is coming to Galax High School this weekend, with over 35 students from GHS in the cast and crew, director Emily Brown and musical director Allison Deel, and enhanced with a live band comprised of Belinda Kohl on piano, Evan Nuckolls on drums and Luke Reeves on guitar.

  • Benefit concert will help Carter Home renovation

    HILLSVILLE – Managers and volunteers of the historic Hale-Wilkinson-Carter Home in Hillsville have been working diligently to raise funds in hopes of continuing restoring the interior design and paying for maintenance and repairs to the building’s foundation and grounds.

    A fundraiser concert will be held this weekend to bring in more money for those efforts.

  • Local churches unite for Easter play

    UPDATE: The March 24 performance has been cancelled due to snow. A decision about the March 25 performance will be made Sunday.

    Rehearsal for “Believe,” the Easter musical hosted by First Baptist Church of Galax, is rolling right along: Pontius Pilate (aka Pastor Sam Bartlett) is onstage wearing a stately toga with sneakers, the disciples are hanging out and chatting in the pews and tech crew members are running around talking into headsets and adjusting equipment.

  • Intersession classes range from karate to rocket science

    HILLSVILLE – Carroll County High School’s intercession classes went out with a blast the week of March 5 as students enjoyed activities ranging from field trips to live music and rocket experiments.

    CCHS Intercession Coordinators Jay Holderfield, Debbie Robinson and Britt Mundy took the interests of all students into mind when coming up with a plan designed to help students think outside the box and to engage them in events that would spark intellectual interest and promote creativity.

  • Art school honors donors at open house

    Chestnut Creek School of the Arts held its first campus-wide open house on March 3, at the main building, the woodworking studio and the pottery studio, all located in downtown Galax.

    The event featured demonstrations, refreshments and appearances by CCSA mascot “Arty,” as well as an unveiling of donor appreciation plaques at the woodworking studio, detailing who had given funds for various aspects of the studio and leaving open slots for future donors.

  • SWVA's $1 billion tourism industry

    Staff Report

    A 56 percent increase in tourism spending in Southwest Virginia since 2004 is highlighted in new report by the Southwest Virginia Cultural Heritage Foundation and the Friends of Southwest Virginia.

    The annual report for 2017 outlines the regional economic impact of the tourism economy and spotlights economic, community and tourism development initiatives, regional marketing and branding.

  • Barter Theatre honors young playwrights

    HILLSVILLE — Four Carroll County High School (CCHS) students reached the semi-final round of competition for the Young Playwrights Festival, hosted by the Barter Theatre in Abingdon.

    The school reports that approximately 125 students wrote individually or in teams for the contest, which just this year received more than 300 entries from schools across the Barter Theatre service area of Virginia and Tennessee. Two plays submitted from CCHS withstood the competition and earned honors to advance to the semi-final round.

  • The Musical Legacy of Bobby Patterson

    Bobby Patterson was no stranger to the stage, having performed with a variety of bluegrass ensembles over the years, but it was his work behind the scenes that made him a vital part of the mountain music world.

    He founded two record labels to shine a light on local musicians, promoted up-and-coming artists, co-founded a mountain music magazine, made sure young music students had access to instruments and helped organize numerous conventions and festivals.

  • Old Crow Medicine Show a musical remedy for the soul

    By the time Old Crow Medicine Show takes the stage of the Blue Ridge Music Center on this Sunday evening, the crowd has already been treated to a couple hours of tunes, from the soulful acoustic blues of Amythyst Kiah to the country-folk-pop fusion of Mipso.

    But when the Crows finally perch behind their instruments and lead vocalist Ketch Secor launches into “Tell It To Me,” the crowd of more than 2,700 on the amphitheater’s hillside is electrified.

    These guys are rock stars, no matter what kind of music they play.