• Trail advocates to meet with forest service

    The Mount Rogers National Recreation Area Trail Advocacy Coalition will meet with U.S. Department of Forestry officials this weekend for a workshop, as the citizen group tries to keep access trails open that allow horseback riders to reach trails at Mount Rogers.

    The group has been lobbying local governments, state representatives and federal officials to prevent the realignment of the recreation area’s trail system.

  • Riders bring trail concerns to forest service

    By DON RICHESON, Staff

    WYTHEVILLE — U.S. Forest Service officials and a Grayson County-based horseback riders group still aren’t seeing eye-to-eye following a forum last week about proposed trail closings.

    But Grayson County resident Elizabeth Thomas, the president and founder of the group, MRNRA Trail Advocates Coalition, sees at least one promising sign – the plan to close most of the horse trails in Mount Rogers National Recreation Area is moving at less of a gallop than before.

  • Naturalists to explore Grayson's highlands

    The 2015 Mount Rogers Naturalist Rally begins May 8 in Grayson County, beginning with the annual dinner in Konnarock.

    The event begins at 5 p.m. on Friday with registration and sign-ups for field trips to be held Saturday. For those only interested in the field trips, registration resumes at 7 a.m. on Saturday, at the Konnarock Community Center.

    There are morning and afternoon outings, with a hotdog lunch break in between. There will be cultural hikes to historic Troutdale and Fairwood Valley.

  • Riders oppose closing horse trails

    By DON RICHESON, Staff

    INDEPENDENCE — A group of Grayson County area horseback riding enthusiasts is speaking out against a U.S. Forest Service proposal to close 80 percent of the trails its members use in the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area.

  • Grant will let Grayson add more trails

    INDEPENDENCE – Grayson County will use federal funding to make significant enhancements to its recreational park after supervisors unanimously approved a resolution authorizing application for grant money last week.

    At the July 10 meeting, County Administrator Jonathan Sweet presented the board with a resolution authorizing the county to seek assistance from the Recreational Trails Programs of the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation for the construction of recreational trails and trail related facilities.

  • Zipline attraction planned for Whitetop

    WHITETOP — The Grayson County Planning Commission approved a special use permit following a public hearing on March 18 for the operation of a zip line ride in the Whitetop area.
    Developer Lenny Cottom attended the meeting to answer questions about the proposed project that will be on property owned by John Doyle Hensley, near the Virginia Creeper Trail.

  • State parks visitation hit record high in 2013

    RICHMOND – Virginia State Parks once again set a new attendance record with 8.87 million visitors in 2013, 6 percent higher than 2012’s record attendance of 8.37 million.
    The 36 award-winning Virginia State Parks are managed by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation.

  • A bolder kind of exercise

    MOUTH OF WILSON ― Park officials, volunteers and outdoor enthusiasts gathered at Grayson Highlands State Park on Saturday to introduce the Split Rock Trail, a new 1.3-mile loop trail that offers both hiking and climbing opportunities to the public.

  • Fries to host 'Catch the Fun' fishing tournament

    The Town of Fries will host the “Catch the Fun Festival” fishing tournament on Saturday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., sponsored by the Fires Fire Department and the Fries Recreation Center.

    Pre-register at Fries Volunteer Fire Department, Fries Town Hall or the Fries Recreation Center

    Prizes will be awarded by length:

    • 1st — $100

    • 2nd — $50

  • Study: trail plan won't infringe on property rights

    The Crooked Road, Virginia’s heritage music trail, has proposed that its coverage region of 19 counties and four cities in Southwest Virginia be designated as a National Heritage Area, “based on the region’s unique musical heritage and its significant role in the formation of American music,” according to a press release provided by the organization.