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Opinion

  • Hospital provided outstanding care

    I recently had eye surgery for cataracts at the outpatient department of Twin County Regional Hospital.

    Everyone — Dr. Davis, the receptionist, secretaries, nurses and the ones in the operating room — were so outstanding and caring. I was treated with special care.

    I wish more people would use our local doctors and Twin County Regional Hospital.

    The old saying, “They need to try it, and they might like it,” is good.

    (Lizzie) Jane Newman

    Fries

  • Will Carroll County and Hillsville's national notoriety forever be based on the controversy that surrounds the commercial breeding of dogs?

    Right now, it looks like once being the home to sizable breeding operations continue to define this place — even though those businesses have apparently been shuttered here.

    Two years after animal advocates took covert video at a breeding operation in Hillsville, our localities can't seem to escape the issue nipping at its heels.

  • We will bear burden of health care

    Within the health care bill under debate in the U.S. Senate are requirements for states to take on more expense for Medicaid.

    Federal law requires state and local governments to balance their budgets every year, but there is no such requirement for the federal government, which is why the feds can keep printing more money or borrowing it from another country to spend outlandishly.

  • State, local candidates endorsed

    I am voting for the candidates whom I feel are best qualified and who best understand our southwestern region of the state.

    I am voting for Virginia Sen. Creigh Deeds for governor, Jody Wagner for lieutenant governor, and Steve Shannon for attorney general.

    I feel they will carry the projects and ideals forward which U.S. Senator Mark Warner and Gov. Tim Kaine began. I applaud them both. They are running for these governmental positions because of their deep commitment to our state.

  • Isaiah 42:3-4a — “A bruised reed he will not break, and a smoldering wick he will not snuff out. In faithfulness he will bring forth justice; he will not falter or be discouraged till he establishes justice on earth. In his law the islands will put their hope.”

     

    They are all around us. 

    These people are bruised. They have had blood vessels broken under the skin from the impact of being hit. They are bruised reeds. 

    They aren’t completely broken but they are devastated and depressed. 

  • Buy local, build economy

    I was pleased to see Patrick Butler's letter asking readers to "bring change and buy local," supporting our local business owners. I would like to emphasize another reason to do so: the multiplier effect.

    When you spend a dollar at a locally owned business, that dollar is likely to circulate several times in our community, multiplying its impact on the local economy, while a dollar spent at a large chain business will likely leave the area after that one transaction.

  • Letting people have their say in the appropriate venue is always a good thing.

    If thinking about a certain topic — say an electric utility's requested rate increase in recessionary times — creates a burning feeling in the pit of a citizen's stomach, it's that person's right to speak up.

    This especially applies if that regular joe needs to express those thoughts to government bureaucrats.

  • Easy solution for illegals

    I had said that illegals get a free ride on health care because they get free service from hospitals that insured patients pay for with hidden administrative charges on our bills.

    A Hotline caller asked if those illegals should be allowed to die in the parking lot by being refused service. They also asked for a solution.

    No, and that’s the most ridiculous question anyone could ask.

  • Well done good and faithful vet,

    You have served faithfully day by day,

    And honored our precious nation,

    That we proudly call the USA.

    You left your home and loved ones,

    And all your dreams and plans,

    To protect the freedoms we hold dear,

    At home and in foreign lands.

    With a heroes heart you went forth,

    To do all that you could do,

    As you offered your life to protect us all,

    Under our old red, white and blue.

    No glory did you seek for self,

  • GHS sportsmanship applauded

    This letter was addressed to Galax High School Principal Bill Sutherland and was copied to Galax school leaders.

    I am writing to share something that occurred after the Nov. 6 football game at Galax High School … because what happened is nothing I had ever experienced at any high school event.

    As I was leaving the field with three Narrows High School football assistant coaches, we walked up the steps through the lingering home crowd that had just watched a great performance from their Maroon Tide players.

  • Everybody’s looking forward to the end of our Great Recession, but at least one bad thing will come along with the good — higher prices.

    Many construction projects have come in under budget around the country, leading consultants to point out the decreasing cost factors to localities with needed infrastructure projects.

    But the nation — with the stock market clawing its way back and federal stimulus funding causing many infrastructure projects to heat up — may soon see an end to construction discounts provided by the soft economy.

  • Bring Change, Buy Local

    To be certain, these are perilous economic times.

    As consumers, we still are frightened by high unemployment figures, a roller coaster stock market, bailouts of major corporations, and a general feeling that the worst may not yet be over.

    With worry comes hesitancy to spend and discretion about items we do purchase. We’ve become a nation of picky buyers and rightfully so.

  • During the coming days, communities across the South will celebrate Textile Heritage Week — this year exploring how our mill hill ancestors survived the Great Depression.

    Many references have lately been made to the Depression because it remains the nation’s yardstick for deprivation and mass insecurity.

    Chronicles usually begin with the October 1929 stock market crash. The South’s mill hills were not only far from that Wall Street epicenter, they were, in so many ways, a world apart. Isolation can be awful, but it can sometimes be an asset.

  • Healthcare a right of all citizens

    This is in reference to Patrick Kelly Sr.'s letter to the editor published Sept. 14 in which he stated that during a meeting at New River Community College, Rep. Rick Boucher did not respond adequately to the question, "Where in the [U.S.] Constitution is wording that would allow for the national government to be involved in health care?"

    I was not present at that meeting and I don't know what Rep. Boucher said, so I will not try to defend him.

  • "Does this have to be in the paper?"

    It's a question a reporter on the scene hears quite often, from those who feel a particular incident isn't newsworthy because, in their opinion, it makes the community look bad or it hits too close to home for the person asking the question.

    (A caller to the newspaper's Hotline once lambasted The Gazette for running an article about a drug bust while thousands of music fans were in town for the fiddlers' convention.)

  • The American Constitution begins with "We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

    Last week, Baywood Elementary students performed a program honoring Constitution Day ee* the birthday of America's government, Sept. 17 ee* and it was enough to make anyone proud to be an American.

  • Trail helps us celebrate heritage

    I read a wonderful article by April Wright in the Dec. 15-16, 2008, edition of the Gazette, titled “Money Trail.”

    The article focused on the $23 million economic impact that the Crooked Road initiative brought to 10 counties and 19 towns stretching from Dickenson to Franklin County.

    Of the $23 million, $13 million was attributed to direct sales of goods. The foundation for the Crooked Road was a regional effort to promote our heritage; one consisting of natural amenities, music and artisans.

  • Reader finds little to compliment in grammar mistakes

    I was just about to write a letter to compliment a reporter on his correct use of the word “complement” in his “Enterprise Zone” article in The Gazette of Sept. 16, when I read his article about Grayson County school construction in the Sept. 18 edtion.

    In this article, he uses the word “complement” incorrectly. I then realized that he must use the word “complement” for both the word “complement” and the word “compliment.”

  • It was announced last week that the Town of Fries was successful in obtaining a $1 million grant to build a new 10,000-square-foot fire department.

    This is very welcome news for the small town, and shows promise that its master plan could be moving forward.

    Ever since the old Washington Mills left the former cotton mill town, Fries has been attempting to revitalize its downtown sector and make it appealing for prospective developers.

  • Parkway celebration to begin

    The Blue Ridge Parkway will celebrate 75 years in September 2010.

    At the 50th anniversary celebration in 1985, more than 6,000 people attended festivities at Cumberland Knob near Galax.

    Parkway officials expect double that number for the 75th anniversary celebration to be held at the Blue Ridge Music Center and Cumberland Knob on Sept. 10-11, 2010.

    A year-long schedule of events will lead up to the grand celebration in 2010, with the first occurring right here in Galax.