.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The Matthews Living History Farm Museum will host a Civil War Living History weekend on March 16 and 17.
    “The event will demonstrate life in a Civil War encampment, including period costumes and living quarters, weapons, demonstrations, music and cooking,” according to a news release for the event.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    Five years ago, a seed was planted that started the process of turning Noel and Peggy Belcher’s dream of owning a winery into a reality. Three years ago, the foundation was put down and the walls went up, creating a home for that dream. Two years ago, Mt. Vale Vineyard’s doors finally opened.
    Today, the founders’ dream continues to grow and thrive. After Peggy Belcher’s passing in 2012, each success becomes a fitting tribute to her memory.

  • HILLSVILLE — Having autism is kind of like being in a foreign country and not speaking the language, but one parent has found that an iPad can help bridge the communication gap.
    Jennifer Dobbs hopes that www.thepuzzlingpiece.com can provide an iPad that son Tyler can use at home, after seeing a benefit from using one in Carroll County Public Schools.
    The website was created by Melissa Winter, a mother of an autistic child who wanted to raise and funds to help children and families affected by autism.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    It all began when John Ayers of Galax visited a brew pub in Charlotte, N.C.
    He was used to beer that can be found in any grocery store, such as Budweiser, Coors and Miller, he said. But when he tried a variety of samplings at the restaurant, his enthusiasm for craft beer began.
    After traveling and sampling the hundreds of brews that are available, he began crafting his own styles in preparation to start his own brewery back home.

  • HILLSVILLE — Growing up during the Great Depression, Velma Bowman Horton worked hard to get the dimes and nickels to go school and become an educator.
    As a teacher and guidance counselor, Horton did her utmost — working constantly and tirelessly — to help Carroll County students get they best education they could, too.
    That’s why friends and family believe that the Velma B. Horton Memorial Scholarship is the perfect way to honor the woman who helped countless people during her 40 years in education.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    On a recent morning, Tammy Harmon saw a strange sight on her way to work.
    “Way down the street, I saw someone walking very slowly,” said Harmon, director of Hope House of the Good Shepherd in Galax. “I didn’t think much about it, and I went inside.”

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    In keeping with his promise, Galax Rite Aid pharmacist Dustin Thomas sat on a chair while coworker Amy Parsons sheared off his locks with a set of clippers. Since the goal was to shave him completely bald, Thomas told her to “have fun with it.”
    And she did.
    “It’s not every day you get to shave your boss’ head,” laughed Parsons. She grinned mischievously as another employee replayed a video of the haircut taken with her phone.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    It all starts with one question and one answer:
    “Will you marry me?”
    “Yes.”
    Many brides agree that this is one of the easiest decisions they will ever make. However, this decision is quickly followed by several other questions that aren’t as easy to answer.
    Where the wedding will take place?
    Who will provide the food?
    What flowers should be bought?

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    For Randy Harmon of Galax, life has almost always been on a fast track. From motocross to race car driving, he has worked to leave quite a memorable impression on the circuits long after the dust clouds settle.
    To continue what seems to be a growing family tradition, Harmon is now shifting more of his focus on to the next generation. His son, Derek, is now following in his father’s tire tracks, and it has already been said by some that he could someday qualify against the titans of racing — NASCAR.

  •  

    William Jones was on his way back to work and just wanted to pick up a soft drink when he bought a Win It All Scratcher ticket from the Virginia Lottery.

    Instead, he walked out of the store with a $200,000 top prize-winning ticket.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    FRIES — After hours upon hours of waiting and worrying, Emily and Johnathan Moretz received the news that they had been praying for.
    Their youngest daughter, Peyton, was out of surgery and doing fine.
    Not only was she fine, but the next day she was rolling over in bed  — something she had never done before.
    Three or four days later, she was sitting up and smiling.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    Frank Edward Morris lived most of his life in Galax and made extensive contributions to the community, especially throughout his long career at American Mirror Company.
    Morris, who passed away on Feb. 3 at age 72, is remembered as a hard worker and a dedicated salesman.
    Morris started working at American Mirror in 1962, and after a couple of years training at the plant and throughout the company, he was made sales manager in 1964.

  • HILLSVILLE — The Fuller Center volunteers built a house, but it’s up to recipient Krystal Rosier and family to make it a home, in the words of Chase Stevens, who worked on the project at Carroll High School.
    More than 30 people gathered with Rosier and family to dedicate the new house that first took shape on the grounds of Carroll County High School before being transported north on Main Street to Crestview Drive last summer and finished on site.

  • Audrey Hope Gillespie may have been born with a rare disease that left her with half a heart, but you’d never know from her sweet, playful nature and her brilliant smile.
    And as if to make up for that little heart, the hearts of her family are singing with joy after musicians both local and national have volunteered to play a concert this weekend to help pay her medical expenses.
    The happy 10-month-old’s cheerful demeanor never hints at the struggles she has been through in her brief time on earth.

  • RICHMOND — One place being celebrated during the “Year of the Virginia Historic Home” is the house built in 1911 by J. Sidna Allen in Fancy Gap.
    Gov. Bob McDonnell declared 2013 the year of the historic home because Virginia’s Executive Mansion will turn two centuries old, according to information posted to a website for that purpose, historicalhomes.virginia.gov.

  • HILLSVILLE — Fancy Gap students want 1,000 paper cranes to carry a message of peace to the children at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Conn.
    Fourth and fifth graders in Anita Semones’ class continue reading “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes,” a story about a girl who survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima to die later of leukemia from exposure to radiation.
    Sadako knew the Japanese adage that if you make a thousand origami paper cranes, you get a wish, the teacher explained. But Sadako died after finishing only 644.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    Years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream of racial equality with the world. Society since that time has changed drastically, making King’s dream a reality.
    Decades after his death, many still find the strength in his words to pursue their own dreams, no matter how difficult they may seem.

  • New River Trail State Park attracted more than one million visitors and had nearly 6 percent more attendance than in 2011.
    The trail that passes through Carroll and Grayson counties and Galax followed the trend that allowed Virginia State Parks to set a new attendance record in 2012.
    State parks attracted 8.366 million visitors, an increase of 7 percent. The new record is a 4 percent increase over the previous attendance record of 8.065 million visitors, set in 2010.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    Groups of black silhouettes circle the air over the hospital and hover around local businesses and residences, roosting in trees and giving some people the creeps.
    During the winter months, scavenger bird sightings in the Twin County area have become more common. As vultures and buzzards settle in for their long winter’s nap, the community is not feeling quite as comfortable.