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Features

  • Cruisin’ and Groovin’ in Galax begins this Friday at 5 p.m. in downtown Galax.
    This is the first of three Cruisin’ and Groovin’ classic car cruise-in events planned in Galax this year, with two others scheduled for July 12 and Aug. 16.
    Streets will close and car registration will begin at 4 p.m. The cruising event begins at 5 p.m., with music by The Attractions beginning at 6 p.m.

  • HILLSVILLE — Members of the Grover King VFW Post 1115 and Ladies Auxiliary held a special ceremony on Flag Day to honor a beautiful symbol of the United States’ national pride, according to organizer Don Dobbins.
    The Stars and Stripes is the fourth-oldest banner in the world, older than even the flags of Great Britain and France.
    “Their countries might be older than ours, but our flag is older than theirs,” he said.

  • Twin County Wellness Center has partnered with The Gazette to offer 2 people each a free, 12-week personal training session!

  • In January, Vatress Williams of Woodlawn handed the Carroll Chapter of Project Linus over to Sarah Melton of Independence.

    Williams had served Project Linus for about five years and got the chapter to supply 4,030 blankets to children in the area.

  • HILLSVILLE — Lilias Turman, 90, reported to the Grover King Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1115 at 5 a.m. on May 15 to help cook breakfast for the many law enforcement representatives that attended the Peace Officers Memorial Day observance.
    It’s for actions like this in a busy schedule of helping her community that Turman’s sisters in the VFW ladies’ auxiliary recognized her as volunteer of the year in Loyalty Day activities.

  • Luke Hampton, an Alleghany County wrestler paralyzed after his spine was injured during a match, is now running his own business and training young grapplers. On Sunday, a free concert in Sparta, N.C., will benefit Alleghany Special Olympics in honor of Hampton.

  • Beginning on May 21, the Galax Recreation Center is offering a new exercise program designed to improve the health of current and former breast cancer patients.
    Leading the class is cancer exercise specialist Renee Stoneman, a fitness guru who is dedicated to improving and maintaining cancer patients’ health.

  • WHITETOP — Grayson Highlands State Park is a beautiful place to visit, hike, camp or just get away from your regular routine. Just be sure to keep your eye to the sky for fast changing weather conditions and always go prepared.
    After my many visits there, I always had a lingering disappointment in the back of my mind every time I was about to make my way down the long winding road out of the park – I still had yet to see the infamous wild ponies that inhabit the balds of the mountain top, which I had heard so many stories about.

  • Randall Zelmer Warf, a World War II veteran who had seen the world past “the Ridge,” had a dream of getting out of the Gossan mines for his family’s sake after returning to the Carroll County community.
    Warf never got to fulfill that dream because he died at 27 in a mining accident in the early morning hours of May 1, 1947, according to family members.

  • Moving a mountain with steam shovels and explosives and hollowing out the earth below through tunneling presented danger and challenges at Gossan Mines in Carroll County.
    Work was periodically interrupted as various kinds of emergencies would occur.
    Newspaper archives on the mines held by the Carroll County Historical Society Museum contain articles on different kinds of problems that arose at Gossan Mines.

  • Gossan Mines shaped life in the Iron Ridge community of Carroll County for 57 years, while workers hauled pyrrhotite ore out of the ground for General Chemical.
    Mine superintendent Fred E. Johnson oversaw the day-to-day operations at Gossan as part of an international mining career.
    Always associated with the extractive industry in his professional life, Johnson earned the moniker “Hardrock.”

  • DURHAM, N.C. — “Bertha” and “Bobby” no longer have to be tethered to Samantha Riggs' side, after she pulled through transplant surgery with a brand new heart at Duke University Hospital.
    Riggs and family had nicknamed the ever-present and cumbersome medical monitoring equipment that were Samantha’s constant companions for months. They joked that it was high time Bertha and Bobby went off on their own.

  • Virginia Tech article, reprinted with permission
    BLACKSBURG — International agriculture education may be a tool for national security, according to research by Austin Larrowe of Woodlawn, a junior at Virginia Tech.
    Larrowe is one of 72 students representing 66 U.S. colleges and universities and selected by the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress to be part of the Presidential Fellows program for 2012-13.
    Each student has worked on an individual research project throughout the year and will turn in their completed paper in May.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    Like most farmers, Donald Brady harvested vegetables and milked cows.
    But what really brought the money in was the business that Brady kept hidden throughout his life: making moonshine.
    Debby Brady Goad, daughter of the late Donald Brady, took the stage at the March 21 “Bluegrass Gravy and River Quilts: Old Home Remedies and Recipes” event, and took listeners back in time to when she was a young girl growing up on her daddy’s farm in Carroll County.

  • WYTHEVILLE — The RFD-TV show “Tough Grit” will feature the Erica Greer of Austinville giving advice, all the while clad in her red work vest, on the proper ways to work with sheep.
    Greer, store manager for the Wytheville Tractor Supply, is a resident of the Carroll side of Austinville.
    The show, a partnership between the retail chain and Grit Magazine  — yes, the same Grit that used to depend on youth to sell subscriptions door-to-door — provides tips on all the chores rural Americans face on a regular basis.

  • Bunnies aren't always the best choice for an Easter present. A Galax rescue group offers a second chance for rabbits who have been abandoned, abused or neglected.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    FANCY GAP — In 2005, Mark and Cheryl Manning decided to make their life-long dream of owning their own campground a reality.
    Soon after, they found the perfect place to start: a campground on Fox Trail Loop in Fancy Gap, off of the Blue Ridge Parkway in Carroll County, that had been there since the 1950s.
    Along with help from the rest of their family, they set to work turning it into the campground they had always imagined.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    The Music Ministry of the First Baptist Church of Galax will present its annual Easter musical this weekend, beginning Friday night at 7 p.m. with repeat performances on Saturday and Sunday.
    “The Way” will tell about the life of Jesus Christ through drama, choir and orchestra performances.

  • By SHAINA STOCKTON, Staff
    The semi-circle of children gathered around Sarah Largen were at full attention as the Galax Public Library’s new youth services coordinator animatedly led them into the wacky world of Dr. Seuss.
    As the whimsical rhyming continued, several small gasps were heard from the audience. Small fingers pointed towards the door, where the Cat in the Hat stood, waving.

  • The Matthews Living History Farm Museum will host a Civil War Living History weekend on March 16 and 17.
    “The event will demonstrate life in a Civil War encampment, including period costumes and living quarters, weapons, demonstrations, music and cooking,” according to a news release for the event.