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Today's Opinions

  • Donors helped feed meal to community

    I would like to express heartfelt thanks to all who helped out in any way with the Christmas dinner that was served at West Galax Diner.
    It was a great success. Not only were we able to provide meals to the community, but all remaining prepared food was donated to Joy Ranch and all other food items were donated to Rooftop.
    We thank everyone for their help and generosity.
    Tina Dowling
    Galax

     

  • Illegal aliens are taking over the country

    The very first requirement for anyone to be called a citizen in America should be to have entered our country legally, not as criminals.
    As criminals, that should be the only requirement needed for putting them out immediately.
    We also need to take a long, hard look at referring to these millions of anchor babies as Americans.
    They are going to continue to take from our children and grandchildren.

  • Dangerous time for police officers

    Law enforcement — the public and things of society.
    The past year has been shameful in this country, when police officers encountered street thugs who thought they ruled the roost.
    From a thief at a store to trying to take an officer’s gun and one selling cigarettes on a sidewalk. All incidents involved African Americans.
    A grand jury [did not indict] a police officer doing his job which caused violence, property damage and total distrust of the police.

  • Rural mail will suffer with more plant closures

    John Edgecombe Jr. is president of the National Newspaper Association and publisher of The Nebraska Signal in Geneva, Neb.

    A friend of mine from South Dakota noted that the U.S. Postal Service delivered a lump of coal to many small towns last Christmas when it proceeded to eliminate overnight mail in most of the nation in 2015.

    That was a good description. USPS will slow delivery by one day for first class and periodicals mail. Many members of Congress have asked it to hold off. But USPS is plowing ahead.

  • 2014 EDITORIAL AWARDS

    Looking back, 2014 was full of things we’d love to forget — ice bucket challenges, “Let It Go,” Kim Kardashian’s butt, rioting, Ebola and shirtless Vladimir Putin.

    Other low points: Kim Jong Un tried to keep a movie out of theaters and local officials wanted The Gazette to put an end to the Readers’ Hotline.

    Neither plan worked.

  • Trafficking in human lives

    Attorney General Mark R. Herring recently announced a statewide campaign to raise awareness of human trafficking in Virginia.

    Human trafficking, also referred to as modern slavery, is a practice in which people are forced or tricked into hard labor, prostitution or pornography in exchange for little to no money.

  • Hotline imperfect, but a platform for conversation

    I am writing about the recent Hotline controversy.
    Whether you like it or not, it sells papers. The trashy tabloids in the grocery stores make a lot of money, too.
    There are 24-hour news channels dedicated to misinformation and half-truths, also.
    In this day and age of social media, anybody can say anything. At least the citizens of the U.S. have the right to free speech, no matter how ignorant they may be.

  • Police body cameras prevent mistreatment

    The massive public reaction to the tragic deaths of three black teens at the hand of white police officers has led to a national call for use of body cameras to record and prevent any future mistreatment of suspects.
    There is ample precedent. Animal protection activists have used body cameras to document egregious atrocities and safety violations by workers in the meat, dairy, and egg industries.
    The resulting videos have led to a number of corrective actions, as well as felony convictions, meat recalls, and even a $500 million civil settlement.