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Today's Opinions

  • Schools, county overcome deficit with teamwork

    Grayson County Public Schools suffered financial turmoil last year with a $900,000 shortfall, which left many in the community concerned and desperately seeking answers as to where so much money disappeared.

    To say things are looking up for the school system just one year later is putting it mildly.

    Last week, school officials announced that they had managed what they were told was impossible: they eliminated the deficit this year, with a closeout budget that landed at an estimated $8 - $11 in the black after covering bills and payroll.

  • Time to declare your independence from meat

    What ever happened to the good old days when our worst worries on the Fourth of July were traffic jams and wayward fireworks?
    A well-warranted worry, according to the Department of Agriculture’s Meat and Poultry Hotline, is food poisoning by nasty E. coli and salmonella bugs hiding in hot dogs and hamburgers at millions of backyard barbecues.
    The hotline’s advice is to grill them longer and hotter. Of course, they avoid mentioning that the high-temperature grilling that kills the bugs also happens to form cancer-causing compounds.

  • Supervisors should have asked before accusing

    It’s something even an elementary school student knows: don’t show up at school without doing your homework.

    Also: never take a test without studying the material.

    A kid can be forgiven for forgetting these rules, and even adults sometimes misunderstand facts. But, we have to hold grown-ups to a higher standard — especially those we elect to hold public office.

  • Positivity, compassion, love can conquer hate

    The local newspapers serve a valuable avenue of communication for the people, but is it fair for you to lay your negative views on all of us continually?
    You are judging and condemning those who have dedicated their lives to serving our country. Maybe we need to ask, “What am I doing for the good of my country or my community.” We are so blessed to live here in God’s mountains and need to be thanking the great source of life every day, rather than constantly complaining.

  • An atmosphere of hatred in America

    Mitt Romney said last week if Trump becomes president, it will lead to an  atmosphere of trickle-down bigotry. But the bigots are not waiting for Trump to be anointed; they’ve already started.
    Last week in Indiana, a woman and her two sons tried to drown a black youth while hurling racist insults. At numerous high school sporting events the last two months, students at mostly white schools have started a chant, “Build the wall!” when playing  schools with large Hispanic populations.

  • Crossroads leaders thank community for giving

    The Crossroads Institute leadership team and staff would like to take this opportunity to thank the individuals, families and small businesses that so graciously donated to our capital campaign fund, to date.
    A wall is being dedicated to honor our donors. These funds will be used wisely, following the needs assessment that has been made of our facility. We have partnered with Grayson National Bank to accept capital campaign donations.
    The Crossroads Institute belongs to citizens of Carroll and Grayson counties and the City of Galax.

  • America faces bleak presidential race

    This year, we the people will elect the next president of a divided nation of gutter politics, violence, racial ugliness and hatred.
    The American people continue to be subjected to some of the lowest tactics by the ones running for president. Right now, it seems it will be Donald (empire mogul) Trump and Hillary (follow the emails) Clinton.
    A few now try to figure out which bathroom to use. The woods are out there.
    God made man and woman. Not an “it.”

  • School board chairman responds to supervisors’ comments

    Carroll County School Board Chairman Brian Spencer released this response at the board’s June 14 meeting in response to criticisms the previous night from members of the Carroll County Board of Supervisors. Some supervisors alleged that the school board deliberately overlooked additional state funds during their budget process.