Today's Opinions

  • We count on the mail

    Chip Hutcheson is president of the National Newspaper Association and publisher of The Times Leader in Princeton, Ky.

    I got the mail today.

    A couple of bills. A greeting card. Some catalogs. A newspaper. One package that my wife grabbed right away. (Wonder what that was?)

    Lately, it occurs to me how completely I take for granted that I will get the mail tomorrow.

  • Don't let political correctness taint debate

    I was glad to see the report on the discussion in the Aug. 10 Gazette about the transgender situation in Grayson County Schools, but that is not the reason for this letter, as I am not stating a position.
    One of the speakers made the comment that they were offended by the opposition to transgendered students being allowed to use the bathroom of their choice.
    The woman making this statement is a well-educated and very nice person, but in this case I believe that political correctness has again reared its ugly head.

  • Voters, educate yourselves

    It is now official: we have our nominees for what could easily be called one of the most controversial presidential elections in our history; and the “Race for the White House,” as CNN so eloquently puts it, has begun.

    What the candidates do between now and November will be crucial in determining who better earns the trust of the majority of the country; that is, if we pay close enough attention.

  • Taking time to thank the community

    In my opinion, thank you Grayson County.
    Recent events have made me conscious of our time here and I want to say thanks to friends, neighbors and hard-working people of Grayson County, Briarpatch Metal Works, Paul’s and Quik Check, which survived a fire and came back.

  • Faith community's mission is to be more inclusive

    Editor’s note: This letter from the Carroll County Ministerial Association was read by the Rev. Amanda Hatfield Moore at a prayer vigil in Galax on July 24 held by Hearts United, which seeks to break down barriers between people and promote unity and peace. The movement began locally, in the wake of police shootings of black suspects around the country, and recent attacks on police officers.

    To the People of Carroll County:

  • Who will protect and serve police?

    Every law enforcement officer who buckles into a patrol car today does so with a heavy heart.

    Everyone who pins on a badge will do so with a mixed sense of frustration and exhaustion, anger and exasperation.

    These men and women have an incredibly difficult job. “Protect and serve” may be the mission, but the responsibilities we place on their shoulders are greater than many of us can imagine.

  • Information isn't flowing freely

    Dick Hammerstrom, a retired editor, is vice president of the Virginia Coalition for Open Government and chairman of the FOIA Committee of the Virginia Press Association. This column first appeared in the Free-Lance Star of Fredericksburg.

    Gov. Terry McAuliffe did not list transparency as a major theme in his campaign for the top elected office in the state. Of course, as any governor-elect would, he told reporters that he planned to run “an open and transparent administration.”

  • There is no Democratic presidential nominee yet

    About three years ago, three highly respected journalists, two from Virginia, one from Georgia, were fired by the Associated Press (AP) for allegedly reporting false information in a story on Virginia’s Governor McAuliffe, retracted shortly after its appearance. Now, the national AP has reported speculation as solid fact: no retraction, no repercussions.
    What did AP do? On June 6, before voters had exercised their constitutional rights in seven contests yet to vote, AP announced Hillary Clinton as the Democratic presidential nominee.