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Today's Opinions

  • Letters to the Editor for 4/13/09

    Dog bear hunting is cruel

    I would like to reply to the March 18 article “Bear License About Control, Not Revenue.”

    I find the article offensive to Virginia hunters by indicating they were out to kill anything they found just because the species was a legal kill. The hunters I know don’t just blow something away because they came across it.

  • Reinventing the Economy

    As our ongoing series, "Adapting to the Economy" has shown, local businesses are reshaping the way they do business in order to survive. We've been impressed by their ingenuity.

    They're doing it on their own, with their own initiative and creativity, not relying on government handouts or taxpayer dollars.

    As the national economy falters, it's encouraging to see our hometown entrepreneurs try new things, scrap what doesn't work and, in some cases, reinvent themselves for today's world.

  • Amnesty, anyone?

    A Laurel Elementary fifth-grader whose family could symbolize the whole immigration debate provided a fresh — and eye-opening — perspective to the President of the United States in just a few hundred words.

    Desiree Nguyen was much closer to the point than a pundit’s fist-pounding rage, broad exaggerations and elaborate scapegoating, as she shared her personal experience as it relates to the conundrum of undocumented workers in the United States.

  • Economic Milestone

    It seems small business development rather than large industry recruitment is the way to go, especially here in Galax and the Twin Counties, after the Small Business Development Center recently announced that it helped gain funding for 100 businesses in the past three years, with 96 of those still operating.

    Though a large manufacturing company willing to put hundreds back to work would be nice, when the economy turns bad, it seems large industries leave the threat of hundreds being stranded without jobs all at once.

  • Let's Hope It Works

    Carroll County educators remain hopeful that federal stimulus funds will work as advertised.

    That's a good thing to hope for. The long-stated purpose of the stimulus funds, after all, involves saving or creating jobs.

    Educators have pointed out that using money coming directly from the federal government, along with the funds going through the state, could save around 20 positions in Carroll County Public Schools alone.

    In a region that continues to fight job losses, every position spared seems like the silver lining in the dark economic cloud.

  • Letters to the Editor for 3/30/09

    Ban wrong way to end smoking

    While the lifelong non-smoker side of me applauds the new Virginia smoking ban, my rebellious redneck side groans in disbelief.

    How many more laws that take away personal choices are going to be enacted? I have a great disdain for any kind of smoking, but I do believe it’s one’s right, if inclined.

    Just the same as it is my right to refuse to do business in a smoking establishment. That’s freedom of personal choice.

  • Letters to the Editor for 3/23/09

    Listen to constituents' opinions

    Once again, we have in Grayson County a prime example of our county supervisors voting in opposition to the will of the people. See “Grayson approves Spirit Harbor request,” March 16.

    For the past 20 years, governments on every level have repeatedly and consistently voted contrary to the will of the majority of the people.

    This amounts to taxation without representation and disenfranchisement. Last time this happened, our forefathers fought a revolution over it. Think it won’t happen again? Think again!

  • Letters to the Editor for 3/9/09

    Jesus stood for love

    In 1604, King James I of England initiated the process for a new interpretation of the Christian Bible, primarily to consolidate the ecclesiology and orthodoxy of the Church of England under royal control.

    He gathered 47 scholars (notably, all members of the Church of England), and seven years later they published what has become known as the King James version of the Bible.