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Today's Opinions

  • Letters to the Editor for 11/16/09

    GHS sportsmanship applauded

    This letter was addressed to Galax High School Principal Bill Sutherland and was copied to Galax school leaders.

    I am writing to share something that occurred after the Nov. 6 football game at Galax High School … because what happened is nothing I had ever experienced at any high school event.

    As I was leaving the field with three Narrows High School football assistant coaches, we walked up the steps through the lingering home crowd that had just watched a great performance from their Maroon Tide players.

  • Expected to rise

    Everybody’s looking forward to the end of our Great Recession, but at least one bad thing will come along with the good — higher prices.

    Many construction projects have come in under budget around the country, leading consultants to point out the decreasing cost factors to localities with needed infrastructure projects.

    But the nation — with the stock market clawing its way back and federal stimulus funding causing many infrastructure projects to heat up — may soon see an end to construction discounts provided by the soft economy.

  • Letters to the Editor for 10/19/09

    Bring Change, Buy Local

    To be certain, these are perilous economic times.

    As consumers, we still are frightened by high unemployment figures, a roller coaster stock market, bailouts of major corporations, and a general feeling that the worst may not yet be over.

    With worry comes hesitancy to spend and discretion about items we do purchase. We’ve become a nation of picky buyers and rightfully so.

  • GUEST EDITORIAL: Celebrating our textile heritage

    During the coming days, communities across the South will celebrate Textile Heritage Week — this year exploring how our mill hill ancestors survived the Great Depression.

    Many references have lately been made to the Depression because it remains the nation’s yardstick for deprivation and mass insecurity.

    Chronicles usually begin with the October 1929 stock market crash. The South’s mill hills were not only far from that Wall Street epicenter, they were, in so many ways, a world apart. Isolation can be awful, but it can sometimes be an asset.

  • Letters to the Editor for 10/12/09

    Healthcare a right of all citizens

    This is in reference to Patrick Kelly Sr.'s letter to the editor published Sept. 14 in which he stated that during a meeting at New River Community College, Rep. Rick Boucher did not respond adequately to the question, "Where in the [U.S.] Constitution is wording that would allow for the national government to be involved in health care?"

    I was not present at that meeting and I don't know what Rep. Boucher said, so I will not try to defend him.

  • Is It Newsworthy?

    "Does this have to be in the paper?"

    It's a question a reporter on the scene hears quite often, from those who feel a particular incident isn't newsworthy because, in their opinion, it makes the community look bad or it hits too close to home for the person asking the question.

    (A caller to the newspaper's Hotline once lambasted The Gazette for running an article about a drug bust while thousands of music fans were in town for the fiddlers' convention.)

  • Renewed Pride

    The American Constitution begins with "We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America."

    Last week, Baywood Elementary students performed a program honoring Constitution Day ee* the birthday of America's government, Sept. 17 ee* and it was enough to make anyone proud to be an American.

  • Letters to the Editor for 9/21/09

    Trail helps us celebrate heritage

    I read a wonderful article by April Wright in the Dec. 15-16, 2008, edition of the Gazette, titled “Money Trail.”

    The article focused on the $23 million economic impact that the Crooked Road initiative brought to 10 counties and 19 towns stretching from Dickenson to Franklin County.

    Of the $23 million, $13 million was attributed to direct sales of goods. The foundation for the Crooked Road was a regional effort to promote our heritage; one consisting of natural amenities, music and artisans.