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Today's Opinions

  • Take what you can get

    Extensive work and marketing has gone into the redevelopment of the old Washington Mills site in Fries, and on Feb. 1, requests for proposals were sent throughout the country.

    The requests mandate that a prospective developer be willing to complete at least three of the projects on the 13.3-acre site, and invest a minimum $6 million.

    We urge the project's management team — comprised of Blue Ridge Crossroads Economic Development Authority, the Town of Fries and Virginia Department of Housing & Community Development — to seriously consider all proposals.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/9/09

    Opposing viewpoint welcomed

    My thanks to Lynn Merrell for her response to my letter of Jan. 12. She eloquently demonstrates the exact attitude about which I spoke.

    Before touching on that subject, however, let’s first revisit her comments regarding Native Americans and monotheism.

    Few valid academicians recognize anything other than a polytheistic belief system for Native Americans, with a couple of notable exceptions — the Natchez and Muscogee Creek tribes.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/16/09

    Put an end to partisan politics

    It appears that Ted Reavis from Carroll County has unleashed yet another baseless partisan attack against Rep. Rick Boucher.

    Reavis simply does not get the public mood that it’s time to put partisan politics aside and work in a bipartisan fashion with Democrats and Republicans cooperating together in order to solve our nation’s serious economic problems.

    This time, Reavis has attacked Boucher for something that the congressman has absolutely no control over.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/23/09

    Say no to Medicaid funding cut

    More than 62 percent of residents of Virginia’s nursing homes are sponsored by Medicaid.

    Most Medicaid recipients in nursing homes were productive citizens, teachers, policemen, farmers, etc., who simply have outlived their savings.

    In caring for them last year, Virginia’s long-term care facilities lost $78 million. Now Gov. Kaine recommends that the General Assembly reduce funding for Medicaid by another $40 million.

  • Revenue Up In Smoke

    It was encouraging to see Republican and Democratic lawmakers in the General Assembly clear the air between them and compromise on a ban on smoking in restaurants and bars.

    What for so long was denounced as a challenge to personal choice and a detriment to businesses was finally seen for what it really is — a public health issue. Choosing to smoke is a personal choice, but doing it in a confined space can infringe on others' rights to be healthy and smoke-free.

  • Proactive Police Force

    Galax Police Chief Rick Clark opened his annual crime report to city council last Monday by first noting that he was accused by a caller in The Gazette's Reader Hotline for being oblivious to some forms of crime that happen in Galax.

    But instead of knocking the Galax Police Department, we should take the time to praise the officers for being proactive and for stepping into harm's way for their fellow citizens.

    The department is not just watching crime happen. It is doing something about it.

  • HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR:

    The Gazette reserves its editorial page for the exchange of ideas and opinions. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Certain guidelines apply. The Gazette reserves its editorial page for the exchange of ideas and opinions. Letters to the editor are welcomed. Certain guidelines apply.

    • Letters should be typed, if possible, and signed in the writer's original handwriting.

    • Letters that are photocopies should bear an original signature that is not copied.

  • The Art of Recovery

    It’s sad news that the economic plague is beginning to take its toll on the area, most recently eliminating Goody’s Family Clothing.

    Despite all the gloom and doom, the City of Galax continues to stay focused on finding other sources of revenue for itself and seeking “creative” forms of employment for others.

    And it is encouraging that economic projects, such as the construction of Chestnut Creek School of the Arts, clearly has the support of the community, as well as artisans from as far as Raleigh, N.C.