Today's Opinions

  • ‘Thoughts and prayers.” Then a failure to act.

    The video is short, only a few seconds long.

    It is shot from below desk level, where a girl in a dress and a boy in shorts are huddled.

    The students’ talking is interrupted by the explosion of gunfire — 15, maybe 16 shots in all, as the kids scream. The shooter isn’t in their classroom, but is close, and the children’s terror is nauseatingly apparent.

  • Reader sees metaphor in lawmakers' crash

    A clear and urgent message has come to me, which I feel behooved to share with the rest of America.
    Last week, a gaggle of Republican lawmakers left D.C. for a most important enclave in Beautiful West Virginia. No doubt to give the cleaning staff time to shovel out all the crap in the halls of government. They mounted their conveyance with family and friends in tow and roared off down the Cumberland Valley.
    They did not complete the trip on board their chartered train. On the way there was a mishap. Analyzing the event, I perceive a clear message.

  • 2018 has had a rough start

    2018 has started out where 2017 ended. Sad and disgusting, where violence has taken the lives of police officers and a little girl who came between the mother and a loser of a boyfriend.
    The same political circus goes on. But with a twist.
    Vulgarity, no shame, the attitude shown from the Oval Office is “I’m the leader and you’re the pumpkin eater — deal with it”
    In that so-called bipartisan meeting of Congress to set out a plan to tackle the problems from immigration to the budget, the end result was who could cuss the most.

  • President not skilled at 'art of the deal'

    I grabbed my coffee on Saturday morning, turned on the computer to see what is happening in the world, and discovered that we had another government shutdown.
    The administration, Fox News and die-hard Trump supporters tried to blame this on Democrats, but the blame rests squarely on Trump’s shoulders.
    Senators Lindsey Graham and Dick Durbin came to the White House with a bipartisan agreement that would have avoided a shutdown.

  • Community helped save Christmas for business

    The residents and employees of Galax Health and Rehab would like to say “thank you” to several people in our community.
    The out-building that houses our seasonal decorations caught on fire in November. The fire was quickly under control because of the quick response of our local fire department.
    Unfortunately, many of our Christmas decorations were destroyed, including our trees.
    Many folks came to our rescue with much-needed donations.

  • Legislators' chance for transparancy

    The Virginia General Assembly has in this session a tremendous opportunity to dramatically improve the commonwealth’s approach to transparency in government.

    Numerous bills now pending before the legislature would make documents more accessible, strengthen the Virginia Freedom of Information Act and bolster accountability for public officials. They would afford residents a clearer view of how government works, which is essential in a democratic republic.

    Crucial to this effort will be a freshman class of legislators for whom openness is a priority.

  • Flaccavento is best choice for 9th District

    Never be beholden to anybody. My daddy taught me that when I was about 10 years old.
    It’s an old way of speaking and it may sound a little stingy at first, but it helps me think twice about who I accept favors from, and what that person might expect in return.
    That’s why I wholeheartedly support Anthony Flaccavento in his 9th District campaign for Congress.
    He will not accept money from corporations. He does not have a PAC fund, where donors can hide their affiliation.

  • State legislators must get to work

    American democracy can be a curious enterprise.

    It often unfolds in predictable fashion, carried out by ordinary citizens in stuffy church assembly halls and drafty school gymnasiums and overseen by a phalanx of volunteers and public officials committed to due process and accurate results.

    But sometimes, on the rarest of occasions and in the oddest of circumstances, popular democracy means control of the House of Delegates is effectively determined by which film canister is drawn from a blue ceramic bowl in a Richmond meeting room.