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Today's Opinions

  • Williams' death opens up dialogue about depression

    The world lost an extraordinary talent on Aug. 11, a comic genius whose wit, insight and ability to connect transcended generations and genres both high and low, serious and comic.

    Robin Williams taught us much about ourselves and our culture: As Mork, a goofy alien sent from the planet Ork to learn about human behavior; as an irreverent deejay questioning the Vietnam War; and as a divorced father who disguised himself as an elderly housekeeper so he could see his kids.

    His death may carry still another lesson, one about the devastating costs of mental illness.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.

  • Convention a passport to lost musical territory

    California-born music writer and critic Greil Marcus once used the term “old, weird America” to refer to the sound of the songs collected on the popular and enduring “Anthology of American Folk Music.”

    The anthology itself was created by another West Coast native, Harry E. Smith, who compiled the three-album set with every American blues, folk and country song he could find. He teased out ballads, “social music” and just plain songs.