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Today's Opinions

  • Burning trees could be unhealthy

    After last year's holiday season there was a huge bonfire, far into the rear of a Christmas tree farm in Elk Creek.
    The plumes of smoke fell over miles of acreage. I observed this activity for days, making no mistake of the scent of pine burning.
    Environmental Protection Agency Law prohibits burning of Christmas trees and tree parts, which are a hazardous environmental pollutant. The law is listed on the Federal Register No.1XC 04‑15448.
    The root systems and foliage of trees absorb pesticides and herbicides used at the farms.

  • Citizens free to speak if rules are followed

    GUEST EDITORIAL

  • APCo rate increases excessive

    This is a vote of appreciation for Chris Brooke's excellent reporting on Appalachian Power Company's excessive rate increases ("Power Struggle," Jan. 14).
    Appalachian Power has a stranglehold on our state's economy.
    Not only are my elderly neighbors having trouble keeping warm, these skyrocketing utility rates are making Virginia less attractive to business, compared to North Carolina.

  • Pondering what's to come in 2011

    I dedicate this letter to all who are concerned and worried about everything from a job, to national security.
    Those with a sense of despair, of feeling left out, and pondering what may come.
    2011 beings hope for a change for good — prosperity, more jobs and fewer political sideshows.
    Sad to say that some in our society have hearts that are hardening, and hatred and evil enter in.
    Violence and bloodshed continue to take innocent lives, from police abuse to the horrible tragedy in Tucson, Ariz.

  • Dentists insist we need more fluoride

    How fortunate we are to have area dentists share with local officials how badly we need more fluoride in our drinking water.
    Even though the Centers for Disease Control says we are getting too much fluoride, our dentists insist that we need more.
    Even though a Virginia Tech study shows that we are already getting too much fluoride in food and everything we drink, these dentists insist that we need more fluoride.

  • Conservationist will be missed

    The passing of Phil Hanes on Jan. 16 was a sad occasion for those interested in conservation in the upper New River valley.
    Phil could only be described as a colorful character, always fascinating to be around, and with many and varied philanthropic interests.
    Phil was very active in the effort to conserve private farmland through conservation easements.
    Conservation easements began to be used locally in the early 1990s as a way for farm owners to preserve family lands and manage the burden of estate taxes.

  • Grayson citizens deserve more

    GUEST EDITORIAL

    Hard times call for tough and difficult decisions. Unfortunately, Grayson County officials seem unwilling or unable to act in a prudent and sensible manner.
    Despite citizens turning out at every public hearing and meeting to express concern over governmental choices, tax increases and property assessments, the public outcries have repeatedly fallen on deaf ears.
    A citizens’ meeting in November was attended by more than 300 people, as the grassroots opposition continues to swell against decisions and practices.

  • Hear them out

    After all the talk of public involvement and listening to constituents by Carroll officials, the unwillingness of the county supervisors to hear out a community member during citizens’ comment time is simply stunning.
    Yes, citizen Mike Goldwasser had spoken about his concerns over a perceived conflict of interest only a month before last Thursday’s board of supervisors meeting.