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Today's Opinions

  • Fancy Gap residents helping themselves

    Fancy Gap doesn't have to reinvent the wheel to grow as a community. With its dedicated people and scenic treasures, the Carroll County hamlet already has a strong foundation for success.

    Sure, maybe installing public water and sewer would make a dramatic impact on the number and type of businesses that set up shop there next to the Blue Ridge Parkway.

  • A big plate of pork

    We've heard a lot of legislators griping lately about the amount of "pork" — spending that benefits a few, usually in the sponsoring politician's home district — in the new federal stimulus package.

    But one man's pork is another's prize. Think about this: all the dire local needs in the Twin Counties — better roads, money for school construction and teachers, funding for utility projects to drive the economy — probably seem pretty porky to politicians from other parts of the nation, but this is the stuff we beg for.

  • Letters to the Editor for 3/2/09

    Resort could cause problems

    We have been following the reporting on the zoning variance request for the trailer park on Foxwood Lane. We are in full support of the planning commission’s decision to not grant a special use permit.

    Our concern isn’t that there will be a shortage of angelic retirees, all of whom will spend their time in church and donating to local charities but, the overall long-term usage of land in Grayson County has to be considered.

  • Take what you can get

    Extensive work and marketing has gone into the redevelopment of the old Washington Mills site in Fries, and on Feb. 1, requests for proposals were sent throughout the country.

    The requests mandate that a prospective developer be willing to complete at least three of the projects on the 13.3-acre site, and invest a minimum $6 million.

    We urge the project's management team — comprised of Blue Ridge Crossroads Economic Development Authority, the Town of Fries and Virginia Department of Housing & Community Development — to seriously consider all proposals.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/9/09

    Opposing viewpoint welcomed

    My thanks to Lynn Merrell for her response to my letter of Jan. 12. She eloquently demonstrates the exact attitude about which I spoke.

    Before touching on that subject, however, let’s first revisit her comments regarding Native Americans and monotheism.

    Few valid academicians recognize anything other than a polytheistic belief system for Native Americans, with a couple of notable exceptions — the Natchez and Muscogee Creek tribes.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/16/09

    Put an end to partisan politics

    It appears that Ted Reavis from Carroll County has unleashed yet another baseless partisan attack against Rep. Rick Boucher.

    Reavis simply does not get the public mood that it’s time to put partisan politics aside and work in a bipartisan fashion with Democrats and Republicans cooperating together in order to solve our nation’s serious economic problems.

    This time, Reavis has attacked Boucher for something that the congressman has absolutely no control over.

  • Letters to the Editor for 2/23/09

    Say no to Medicaid funding cut

    More than 62 percent of residents of Virginia’s nursing homes are sponsored by Medicaid.

    Most Medicaid recipients in nursing homes were productive citizens, teachers, policemen, farmers, etc., who simply have outlived their savings.

    In caring for them last year, Virginia’s long-term care facilities lost $78 million. Now Gov. Kaine recommends that the General Assembly reduce funding for Medicaid by another $40 million.

  • Revenue Up In Smoke

    It was encouraging to see Republican and Democratic lawmakers in the General Assembly clear the air between them and compromise on a ban on smoking in restaurants and bars.

    What for so long was denounced as a challenge to personal choice and a detriment to businesses was finally seen for what it really is — a public health issue. Choosing to smoke is a personal choice, but doing it in a confined space can infringe on others' rights to be healthy and smoke-free.