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Today's Opinions

  • Grayson voters ignore intelligent candidates

    A couple of things have gotten me confused lately.
    Like this thing with the schools. How’d they end up short on money?
    I recall a couple years back, shutting down schools and building a new one out in the country was going to fix that shortfall. Dragging kids out before dawn and bussing them all over the place made fiscal sense.
    So how come now there’s all this fussing over giving teachers a raise and docking students for not showing up?

  • Commission nomination controversial

    You have to wonder what Pine Creek District Supervisor Bob Martin was thinking when he nominated Billy Mitchell to serve on the Planning Commission last month.

    Mitchell, a former county administrator, was convicted 17 years ago for embezzling more than $400,000 from the Carroll and served time in federal prison.

    Martin has gone on record with his belief that Mitchell has been paying his dues and deserves a second chance.

  • More information needed on new industries

    I’ve been hearing a bunch of cloudy claptrap from our Grayson County supervisors about “job creation.” I have problems with their claim.
    The supervisors are not hiring or paying anybody.
    Recently they have been taking credit for decisions by three business firms which allegedly will locate in Grayson County (at undisclosed dates) and hire 300 people.

  • Employers should value their workers

    In light of recent low-wage earner strikes, there should be a book titled “How to Treat Employees for Dummies.”
    Highlights would read something like this.
    First, remember that employees are as vital to your business as the customer is. And that the employee stands “between” you and your customer.
    So the employee can make your customers happy, or they can make them very sad. And without your customers, you’re out of business. So it’s in your best interest to have “happy” employees. And how do you do that?

  • 'Smart' meters raise safety privacy concerns

    In an earlier letter, I encouraged readers to research the dangers of [AEP’s automated radio frequency meters]. There’s a wealth of scientific and medical research showing the meters to be unsafe. I recommend www.takebackyourpower.com, www.stopsmartmeters.org and www.tamers.biz.
    The World Health Organization classified these meters, along with other similar devices that produce non-ionizing radio frequency radiation, as a (possible) 2B carcinogen. This is the same category as DDT, leads and engine exhaust.

  • Independence needs dental alternatives

    Is there any way a group could help the people get a dentist who will charge a reasonable price for dental healthcare? It would mainly be for poor people who cannot pay up front. If the people did not pay as promised, there could be an ordinance to collect it from them.

  • Coyote bounty payments take away from schools

    I was astounded to read that the Grayson County Board of Supervisors is cutting money out of the schools, but adding $10,000 total additional dollars to the archaic coyote bounty program and killing contest.
    There are a lot of reservations about North American wild dogs, but it’s scientifically proven that these contests in fact make the population increase. Thus, it’s a waste of taxpayers’ money, and will only hurt farmers later down the road.


  • Vaccinate for everyone's sake

    Doing everything you can to avoid spreading disease is among the most basic requirements of membership in a civil society. It has been for millennia.

    Trying to prevent the transmission of pathogens explains the laws in Leviticus, the development of modern sewer systems and the use of quarantine to stem epidemics.

    Throughout history, a person’s duty to prevent the spread of disease to his neighbors has been so fundamental that it has been largely uncontroversial. Then came modern America, which is in the middle of an entirely preventable measles outbreak.