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Letters

  • Carroll should ask attorney general's opinion

    The Carroll Board of Supervisors seems to think that the question about the county administrator’s potential conflict of interest with his investment in land near Wildwood has been put to rest.
    The chairman has stated that their collective conclusion is that there is no evidence of conflict of interest and that the board stands unconditionally behind Mr Larrowe.
    It is not clear that this conclusion is justified. It is based on a review by the county attorney, a person who relies on the board for employment.

  • Burning releases toxic chemical dioxin

    In response to the editor's note on Christmas tree waste burning: the real issue is "waste burning of chemical compounds creating toxic dioxin" causing health damages.
    The Environmental Protection Agency confirmed in the 1970s that dioxin is a cancer hazard and serious health threat. Its science advisory board published a nine-volume report. In 1986 it proposed controls on dioxin emissions. EPA Chief William Reily reported increases in cancers to people exposed to dioxin, 82 percent above the norm.

  • Sheriff was a change for the better

    We would like to respond to Mark Burnett’s announcement as a candidate for Grayson County sheriff. We would like to clarify some statements that have been made against Sheriff Richard Vaughan.
    Concerning Mr. Burnett’s open door policy, Mr. Vaughan’s door is always open and he does return calls. If you go there and he is not there, it is because he is out working on cases, and not just sitting behind a desk waiting on things to come to him.

  • Restore rights to nonviolent felons

    This letter was addressed to Del. Mark Cole (R-Spotsylvania) and was copied to The Gazette. The author described himself under his signature as “convicted felon and former Carroll County administrator.”

    I read with sadness your opposition to Senate Joint Resolution 284, to allow an opportunity to amend the Virginia Constitution to allow automatic restoration of civil rights to nonviolent felons once they complete their sentences.
    Being a nonviolent felon, I know firsthand the disgrace and prejudice associated with a felony conviction.

  • Disagree, but be respectful

    I've often regarded the Readers’ Hotline as being similar to driving by a traffic accident — can't help but look, but after doing so I don't feel so good.
    The comment in the Feb. 2 edition was over the line and I feel The Gazette showed poor taste in printing it.
    I'm referring to the call by someone implying Mr. Goldwasser addressing his concerns to the Carroll supervisors, as "wanting to control everybody, vindictive, angry and hostile" and then even dragging his wife into it!

  • Who to blame but ourselves?

    Do you remember when you could buy a five-pound can of coffee for $4? Now you can buy a five-pound can with two pounds and 2.5 ounces of coffee for only $7 to $9 per can.
    Now that’s a good deal!
    Do you remember the Pepsi Cola jingle: Pepsi Cola, that’s a lot, twice as much for a nickel, five cents, too (12 ounces). Pepsi Cola is the drink for you.
    What do you pay for a can now!
    Do you remember when a two-pound loaf of bread cost 30 cents? Now a one-pound loaf is $1 in the best price in town.

  • Grayson opted out of ag districts

    In the Jan. 21 edition, you quoted Virginia Cooperative Extension agent Webb Flowers as saying, "I don't believe there's a single board of supervisors in the state of Virginia that have rejected an application."
    Flowers needs to be informed that Grayson County holds that distinction of rejecting an application.
    In November 2003, the Grayson Board of Supervisors rejected the very first (and I believe the only) application it received.
    It was for a forestal district of 250.96 acres involving two landowners. The reasons given were:

  • Goldwasser not afraid to ask

    Mike Goldwasser is a friend of mine. Anyone who knows Mike, knows he can be passionate about issues involving his community and the openness and fairness of local government.
    Mike is not afraid to step forward and ask questions or make statements that many of us wish we had the nerve to verbalize publicly.
    Mike knows he sets himself up for criticism and ridicule, but is willing to take the heat for what he thinks is right.
    The Carroll County Board of Supervisors erred when it did not allow him his three minutes.

  • Driven by care for community

    In response to the ill-informed Readers’ Hotline comment, “Misplaced anger,” during the 38 years that Mike and I have been married, I have never seen him lose his temper or lose his sense of fairness.
    By temperament, he is compassionate, caring and controlled.
    In various organizations, he has been pressured to be on their board because of his ability to listen objectively to all sides.
    His clarity and fairness would have made him an excellent lawyer had he continued at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

  • Empty prison an outrage

    This state prison controversy is a sterling example of well-intended officials who "have no clue."
    These folks failed to envision how the world really works.
    To end up with an empty structure sucking up precious taxpayer dollars in this struggling economy is nothing short of outrageous, particularly at a time when prison officials all over the nation are sounding a clarion call for help with overcrowding.