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Letters

  • Will history repeat in this election?

    “The more things change, the more they remain the same.”
    Running against then-President John Adams, Thomas Jefferson engaged in a despicable campaign of character attacks against President Adams.
    Adams refused to respond to Jefferson’s abominable tactics in any way and therefore lost the election.
    Will history repeat itself? Can any thinking person not see that mankind needs a Redeemer?
    Donn Bogert
    Galax

  • Mystery of property ownership solved

    On May 15, about 20 people attended a dedication service I conducted at Randal and Hilda Sutherland’s farm in Elk Creek.
    No one who I know had an official document which proved whether it was James or his brother David Cornutt (Cornett) who was my Revolutionary War ancestor, but since then, thanks to three cousins, I now possess a petition and a partition which provide evidence that my fifth great-grandfather is David, and not his brother James, who died in 1824.

  • Cruisin' & Groovin a good time for all

    I was gratified to see the Readers’ Hotline item about how much the caller enjoyed “Cruisin’ & Groovin’ in Galax” on June 15.
    We had at least 325 antique and classic vehicles and more than 4,000 people there, with wonderful music, vendors, balloons and beach balls, and lots of family fun.
    While the band for that night, the Catalinas, was sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce and WBRF-WWWJ radio, the events are actually planned and coordinated by the Galax Downtown Association, your local merchants association.

  • Little church making big difference

    Asbury United Methodist Church dates back to at least 1817. The present-day church was built on Glendale Road in Galax about 1939.
    The church has seen many changes over the years. Berylene Patton, a lifetime member, along with her husband, Mack, established a clothing and household closet prior to her death in 2004.
    Recently, Mack and Berylene’s daughter, Karen Poole, along with several others have expanded the clothes/household closet and food pantry.

  • Americans have little to be proud of

    There was once pride in being an American.
    Now, with this government allowing millions of illegals in and taking over America with drug money, and these politicians taking away from Americans and giving away to this evil, along with our children’s future and calling them Americans, there is little anymore for Americans to be proud of.
    Bud Cox
    Galax

  • Grayson Fiddlers' Convention a success

    What a wonderful weekend.  The weather was perfect and the Grayson County Fiddlers’ Convention went off without a hitch.
    The Elk Creek Fire Department does a great deal of planning, prior to the event, but it is all of our community volunteers that make it happen.  The Elk Creek Volunteer Fire Department is truly a community fire department.
    We thank each person who helped in any way to make the fiddlers’ convention successful.

  • Act sets healthcare standards

    This letter was addressed to Rep. Morgan Griffith.

    I appreciate your letter of May 18. You made several accusations with which I must take issue.
    You assert that there are some in Washington that “arrogantly” believe they know what is best for seniors, which is “government‑run health care.” I assume that you are not “arrogant” and do not assert that you know what is best for our seniors.

  • Larry South was asset to Hillsville

    Adapted from lengthy remarks to Hillsville Town Council on June 25.

    After reaching into my memory bank, conversing with friends, neighbors, and town employees, and perusing written material, I came up with a list of “changes” made by the Town of Hillsville since 1993.

  • Outgoing clinic director looks back

    June 15 was my last day as executive director of The Free Clinic of the Twin Counties. I began my position in 2006, when it was still called Baptist Medical Clinic of Galax, Inc.
    We were a clinic “without walls,” which meant we basically referred patients to doctors’ offices. We had no equipment or supplies, only 32 patients, and an annual income of $32,000.
    My job was to build community awareness, lead the clinic to open a physical location and then manage the day to day activities.

  • Brief encounter made an impression

    This past Monday, I had the distinct privilege to meet a true Southern Gentleman, Mr. John B. Vaughan.
    I do minor volunteer work at the emergency room at Twin County Regional Hospital a few days a week. I transferred Mr. Vaughan from the ER to his room on the floor. We had a very pleasant conversation.
    He saw my volunteer ID and asked why I did it. I said, half jokingly, that it kept off the streets and that there were some bad people out there.
    He smiled and said there were a lot more good people out there too. I said yes there were and wished him well.