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Columns

  • The best shelter begins with a caring community

    I’ve often heard people who have come to Galax, Grayson County or Carroll County remark that this area has the nicest people.
    So how have we gotten so out of touch with the sad reality of what is happening to our animals here?
    When did it become acceptable to kill animals because there were just too many?  When did we decide that animals have no value or purpose?
    How often do you pass by the animal shelter on your way to church — a place where many find their sense of a loving community?

  • Shelter policies need to change

    Mandy Price-Moin of Durham, N.C., is a Galax native who volunteers with animal rescue operations.

    Would you be upset if your family pet was put to death before you found it or someone else had a chance to adopt it?
    I know I would be. In fact, I’m furious because this is happening in my hometown at the Galax-Carroll-Grayson Regional Animal Shelter.

  • Electric rates reflect costs

    Charles Patton is president and chief operating officer of APCo

  • Not just a day off

    Amid the backyard barbecues and trips to the beach today, let us not forget the true meaning behind Memorial Day. It's not an excuse for a sale, or the official beginning of summer; nor is it just another day off from work.
    Celebrated since May 30, 1868, Memorial Day is a time to remember the men and women who have fought and died for our freedoms, in conflicts throughout history.

  • The way it should be

    People want relief from high fuel and power prices, so the news about energy efficiency grant is welcome.
    An Earth Day announcement of a $75,000 from the Appalachian Regional Commission should get things going in the right direction.
    That and $90,000 match of cash and in-kind contribution from partners will first concentrate on ideas for improving energy efficiency.
    After that, a second phase will produce alternative energy demonstration projects.
    This will include putting up solar panels at Matthews State Forest and wood-fired gasification.

  • Conservation easements can benefit taxpayers

    David G. Yolton is a land trust board member.

    In the New River Valley, we face a huge challenge:  How do we preserve the bounty of nature and our rich natural resources, the envy of many on this planet?
    The New River Land Trust is a non-profit organization committed to conserving farmland, forests, open spaces, and historic places in Virginia’s New River region, including the counties of Bland, Carroll, Giles, Floyd, Grayson, Montgomery, Pulaski, Wythe, and the cities of Galax and Radford.

  • Prevent animal cruelty

    By Suzanne Collins, Twin County Humane Society

    Twin County Humane Society reminds the public that April is Prevention of Animal Cruelty Month.
    Recognizing animal cruelty is not always simple. What constitutes animal cruelty or abuse?
    Unintentional abuse usually occurs when someone is ignorant of the proper way to care for a pet.

  • FACE-IT: a community approach to addiction

    John Bigger of Fayetteville, N.C. is project director of FACE-IT

    If someone told you that 10,000 adults had a treatable disease and that 9,000 were going without treatment, would you be concerned?
    That this disease affects 8.25 percent of the county’s adult population, would you be concerned?
    This community has a silent epidemic eating away its resources — destroying families, damaging businesses, giving rise to criminal acts, hindering children’s success, taking lives prematurely.

  • 'Tragedy' play would be a powerful event

    By Gene Dalton of Hillsville

    The Carroll County Centennial Citizens Committee should rethink its decision to not do a play or some type of production on the 100th anniversary of the “Carroll County Courthouse tragedy.”
    While growing up in Carroll County, I often heard about the “Hillsville courthouse shooting.” It is a major piece of local and national history.
    So, I was disappointed to hear of the decision. It's a most interesting story.

  • Let post office adapt to survive

    The United States Postal Service is careening toward insolvency, with projections showing it finishing another year spending far more than it earns.
    A report issued this month by the Government Accountability Office revealed the postal service posted a net loss of $329 million in the first quarter of the current fiscal year.
    It's on pace to lose $6.4 billion through September, barely has $1 billion in cash reserves and plans to borrow billions more this year from the U.S. Treasury, pushing its debt level to the maximum allowed by law — $15 billion.