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Columns

  • Squad puts patient's needs first when arranging transport

    Jason Felts of Galax is 1st Lieutenant with Pipers Gap Rescue Squad Inc.

  • Move over to protect those who protect us

    The death of a local tow truck operator on Interstate 77 is a stark reminder that Virginia's "Move Over" law also applies to these first responders, just as it does to police, fire and rescue workers assisting motorists on our highways.
    In fact, Virginia State Police issued a reminder alert about the Move Over law just two days before Russell Nelson of Hillsville was struck by a vehicle and killed over the Memorial Day weekend.

  • Community bands together to help Oklahoma

    In the wake of a deadly series of tornadoes that devastated the lives of thousands in Oklahoma, organizations in our community and all over are banding together to deliver relief in as many ways as they can.
    The Galax Fire Department, Cornerstone Church and God’s Pit Crew have joined to collect everything from food and basic items to money and prayers for the tornado victims.
    Woods River Chapter of the American Red Cross is also requesting monetary donations to help put together the relief kits.

  • Buckle up before you start car

    Taking two seconds to strap on a seat belt indisputably saves lives.
    Yet researchers from a Virginia university found that more than a fifth of drivers still refuse to make that life-saving click.
    Fortunately, the research can help guide law enforcement and education efforts to persuade more people to buckle up.
    Researchers at Old Dominion University used a low-tech method to capture data. They stood at the side of roads throughout the state, clad in orange vests, clipboards in hand to eyeball passing drivers, making note of who was wearing a seat belt.

  • Virtual school took advantage of Carroll

    When Virginia’s first statewide virtual school opened in 2009, it looked to be a good deal for the private operator and its host, Carroll County, but a bad deal for state taxpayers.
    Now the Carroll County School Board has concluded it’s getting a raw deal, too, and voted to end its contract with the for-profit K12 Inc.

  • Removing obstacles to higher education

    A higher education for residents of Galax, Carroll County and Grayson County used to entail a lot of mileage and time away from work and family, not to mention unthinkable amounts of gas money.
    Today, that’s no longer the case.
    After Crossroads Institute opened in 2005, locals were able to take distance learning classes through Wytheville Community College, which offers an assortment of two-year degrees and the opportunity to transfer to even higher institutions of learning.

  • Survey points out healthcare needs

    Judging by the results of Twin County Regional Hospital’s recent community survey, steps are being made in the right direction with the facility since the merger with Duke LifePoint.
    Late last year, approximately 308 people were randomly selected to weigh in on what they loved and hated about the healthcare options available in this region.
    TCRH set the bar in several categories, scoring high in categories such as general practice, convenience, positive staff attitudes and outpatient care.

  • Frustration grows on flooded street

    Most people who live in the Twin Counties will agree: the weather has been tough on us for the past few months.
    Starting at the end of December, we were hit with rain, snow and ice. Some loved the opportunity to snuggle up at home and take a “snow day,” while others hated it because they still had to drive ― and sometimes slide ― to and from work in the slushy muck.
    But even those who fit into the latter were the lucky ones, compared to the residents of Givens Street in Galax.

  • Sheriff recognizes emergency dispatchers

    By Carroll County Sheriff John B. Gardner

  • Put downtown Galax ideas into action

    The Galax City Council recently viewed the results of a survey of the downtown area conducted by RKG Associates. Over the course of several months, they carefully studied the area to pinpoint its strengths and weaknesses, and determined what could be done to spike the interests of both tourists and residents.
    Studies revealed that the area has a great foundation, with a rich history of art and music that draws in tourists from all over the world.