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Columns

  • Virtual school took advantage of Carroll

    When Virginia’s first statewide virtual school opened in 2009, it looked to be a good deal for the private operator and its host, Carroll County, but a bad deal for state taxpayers.
    Now the Carroll County School Board has concluded it’s getting a raw deal, too, and voted to end its contract with the for-profit K12 Inc.

  • Removing obstacles to higher education

    A higher education for residents of Galax, Carroll County and Grayson County used to entail a lot of mileage and time away from work and family, not to mention unthinkable amounts of gas money.
    Today, that’s no longer the case.
    After Crossroads Institute opened in 2005, locals were able to take distance learning classes through Wytheville Community College, which offers an assortment of two-year degrees and the opportunity to transfer to even higher institutions of learning.

  • Survey points out healthcare needs

    Judging by the results of Twin County Regional Hospital’s recent community survey, steps are being made in the right direction with the facility since the merger with Duke LifePoint.
    Late last year, approximately 308 people were randomly selected to weigh in on what they loved and hated about the healthcare options available in this region.
    TCRH set the bar in several categories, scoring high in categories such as general practice, convenience, positive staff attitudes and outpatient care.

  • Frustration grows on flooded street

    Most people who live in the Twin Counties will agree: the weather has been tough on us for the past few months.
    Starting at the end of December, we were hit with rain, snow and ice. Some loved the opportunity to snuggle up at home and take a “snow day,” while others hated it because they still had to drive ― and sometimes slide ― to and from work in the slushy muck.
    But even those who fit into the latter were the lucky ones, compared to the residents of Givens Street in Galax.

  • Sheriff recognizes emergency dispatchers

    By Carroll County Sheriff John B. Gardner

  • Put downtown Galax ideas into action

    The Galax City Council recently viewed the results of a survey of the downtown area conducted by RKG Associates. Over the course of several months, they carefully studied the area to pinpoint its strengths and weaknesses, and determined what could be done to spike the interests of both tourists and residents.
    Studies revealed that the area has a great foundation, with a rich history of art and music that draws in tourists from all over the world.

  • Volunteers rose to challenge in I-77 crisis

    It was a somber Easter weekend this year due to the series of crashes on Interstate 77 on March 31.
    Due to a combination of foggy conditions and precautions that were sadly not taken by drivers, dozens were injured and three are dead as a result of the massive pileup.
    When word of this crisis spread, our local police officers, EMTs, firefighters and ordinary citizens reported to the scene or gathered where they could to provide help the injured and the stranded. On The Gazette's Facebook page, readers time and again sought information on ways they could help.

  • Strength in numbers

    They say that it takes a village to raise a child, so perhaps it takes an entire region to care for the smaller communities within it.
    The announcement last week of Twin County United Way’s merger with United Way Virginia Highlands came with a lot of positivity — along with many questions about what happens next.
    What changes are going to be made?
    Where will the funding go?

  • A squad's proud legacy

    For several months, it appeared that Hillsville Rescue Squad's legacy would be one of controversy and ill will, after town officials began questioning the need for its continued existence since it had essentially disbanded.
    There were accusations and finger-pointing about funds, personnel issues, inappropriate use of vehicles, the sale of a squad building and equipment. All that negativity threatened to overshadow the good that the volunteer organization had done over the years.

  • Bluegrass, conspiracy link a real stretch for Tea Party

    This column by Dan Casey originally was published in The Roanoke Times.