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Columns

  • Despite steep cost, curvy road at least needs warning signs

    As Grayson County citizens sign a petition to get the Virginia Department of Transportation to erect better warning signs for unsuspecting truckers traveling on Comers Rock Road, people in Carroll County are no doubt feeling a little déjà vu.

  • Library book review could benefit from variety of viewpoints

    The Galax High School Library Book Committee was recently formed to create a screening matrix for books coming into the high school library.
    The group is made up of a handful of individuals, including school officials, parents and one honor student. And while they plan to get input from the community on this issue, Superintendent Bill Sturgill noted that he wants to be careful about the group’s size, since too many voices could halt productivity.

  • How about a limited government?

    John J. Nunn of Galax is a retired furniture manufacturer and internet service provider.

  • Grading scale fails to give accurate portrayal of public schools

    School officials are concerned about the state Board of Education’s recent approval of an A-F grading scale for schools, and rightly so.
    The new scale, which will assign an overall grade for every school in Virginia, will complement the accreditations and federal accountability rating systems that are already in place. However, many educators feel that the grade will give too simplistic a view of their schools’ capabilities.

  • Getting ready for the insurance marketplace

    GUEST EDITORIAL
     By Jon D. Applebaum, CEO of Twin County Regional Healthcare

  • County needs more home-grown jobs

    From the outside looking in, it seems careful and considerate planning went into the economic development effort that led to the announcement of Virginia Produce Co. expanding to four times its current size.
    Job creation efforts in Carroll County have many times in the past followed a simple money model.

  • Injured veterans need help, fewer delays

    After an appalling display of inefficiency in helping disabled veterans earlier this year — nearly 900,000 had pending disability claims, and two-thirds of those had been waiting for at least four months — the Department of Veterans Affairs has made progress.
    In four months, the backlog has shrunk by nearly 20 percent, President Barack Obama told the Disabled American Veterans convention recently. Claims processors are working overtime through next month, and a switch to computerized records rather than manual has helped speed the work.

  • Aging population deserves better

    It wasn’t a terribly long time ago when the senior citizens of our community were held in the highest regard.
    But in today’s world, it seems like their place in society has steadily fallen to an alarmingly low priority when it comes to government funding. The cuts to District Three’s programs for the aging are a clear example.
    Beginning in October, the organization will see a $100,000 drop in support for these programs, making this the third year in a row where it has had to cut corners in these same areas.

  • A Tribute to Audrey Hash Ham

    by Walter T. Messick, Mouth of Wilson

  • TCRH adjusts to challenges of healthcare industry

    By Twin County Regional Hospital Administration