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Columns

  • The devil in the details of Carroll's ethics code

    The idea sounds good at first — an ethical Carroll County government is just what everybody wants.
    How could anybody disagree with that?
    As usual, the devil is in the details, specifically number 18 in the code of ethics, which tells all general county representatives and citizens who volunteer on boards, commissions, authorities, committees and whatnot to refer all media inquiries to the county administrator’s office.

  • United Way needs our help

    GUEST EDITORIAL

    Twin County United Way needs the community's help.
    Since 1957, through the community's generosity, TCUW has provided millions of dollars to dozens of Twin County non‑profit organizations.
    Now we, like many we serve, have fallen on hard times. Without a substantial increase in donations, our long‑term existence is doubtful.
    Last year, TCUW fell more than 50 percent short of its $215,000 campaign goal. We had to cut by 25 percent contributions to the 26 agencies we serve, dipping into reserves to do so.

  • Citizens free to speak if rules are followed

    GUEST EDITORIAL

  • Grayson citizens deserve more

    GUEST EDITORIAL

    Hard times call for tough and difficult decisions. Unfortunately, Grayson County officials seem unwilling or unable to act in a prudent and sensible manner.
    Despite citizens turning out at every public hearing and meeting to express concern over governmental choices, tax increases and property assessments, the public outcries have repeatedly fallen on deaf ears.
    A citizens’ meeting in November was attended by more than 300 people, as the grassroots opposition continues to swell against decisions and practices.

  • Hear them out

    After all the talk of public involvement and listening to constituents by Carroll officials, the unwillingness of the county supervisors to hear out a community member during citizens’ comment time is simply stunning.
    Yes, citizen Mike Goldwasser had spoken about his concerns over a perceived conflict of interest only a month before last Thursday’s board of supervisors meeting.

  • It's about time

    For too long, the residents of Givens Street and the surrounding neighborhoods in Galax have been forced to live in a water-logged past that ended for most of the city in the 1940s, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers rerouted and reinforced Chestnut Creek to prevent frequent floods that often washed away the low-lying areas.
    In recent years — most notably in 2007 and most recently last summer — residents of these neighborhoods were surrounded by backed-up flood waters caused by inadequate and dilapidated stormwater drainage systems.

  • 2010 EDITORIAL AWARDS

    As we look back on 2010, two long-standing disasters remain poised on the threshold of being resolved.
    Jobs — at least some — appear to be returning to the Twin Counties, and Carroll County appears to be getting along with Hillsville.
    It boggles the mind.
    As everything is now hunky dory between Hillsville and Carroll County, a state commission is expected to approve the town boundary adjustment and water and sewer billing settlement.

  • Seeing the results

    A trio of new job announcements were welcome news in the two weeks before Christmas — a positive end to a year of economic stagnation. A new solar panel product line at Guardian Industries in Galax will create 40 jobs; Bucyrus in Hillsville will add 32 workers and a new company, Independence Homes, will employ 42 people after it opens in Grayson County.

  • Fluoride fears unfounded

    I am writing in response to the Virginia-Carolina Water Authority meetings attended by a group of people opposed to water fluoridation.
    The most recent meetings were Nov. 15 in Independence and with the Alleghany County Board of Commissioners in Sparta, N.C.
    Several citizens with the newly formed group spoke against water fluoridation by the water authority.

  • Every donation counts

    As it has for nearly three decades, the Galax Y's Men Club is once again undertaking a project that helps hundreds of local families have a brighter Christmas.
    Through the 28th Annual Community Christmas Chest fundraiser, the Y's Men are working hard to solicit funds from the community to pay for food boxes delivered to needy families at Christmas.
    It's truly a case of neighbors helping neighbors, as the majority of funds come from individuals. Businesses, churches, schools and civic organizations also chip in to help the Christmas Chest reach its goal.