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Columns

  • Attention to government should start at local level

    In the past year, the subject of politics has been at the forefront of almost everyone’s minds… or at least, it is certainly a topic people can’t seem to get enough of.

    But in spite of this growing trend, there is still a strong sense of disconnect in attention spans for local politics.

  • AHCA would lower healthcare costs

    By Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-Salem)

    This month, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act to repeal Obamacare and start a health care reform process to return power to the states, drive down costs, and offer options to American families.

  • TCRH embraces new mission for future

    Since 1973, Twin County Regional Healthcare has proudly served the healthcare needs of people throughout the Twin County area and surrounding communities. As part of Duke LifePoint Healthcare, we are building upon this legacy and strengthening our hospital for the future.

    We are fortunate that Duke LifePoint shares our commitment to improving the overall health and wellbeing of our communities, and ensuring that people here have access to quality care close to home.

  • The high cost of fighting crime

    We all want law and order, safe neighborhoods and criminals taken off the streets. It’s one of the main things we expect our local governments to provide.

    But what many don’t know is the high cost of safety, especially in terms of incarceration.

    This was brought into focus last week at a Carroll Board of Supervisors’ budget meeting, when it was revealed that the county’s cost of keeping prisoners at the New River Valley Regional Jail would increase by $400,000 next fiscal year.

  • Slow drivers keep right, or else

    The next time you’re driving down a highway in Virginia, late for an appointment, and you find traffic knotted behind somebody dawdling in the passing lane, ask yourself how much that inconvenience is worth.

    Gov. Terry McAuliffe thought left-lane squatters should face a fine of $100 if they won’t move into the travel lanes; the initial legislative proposal from Del. Israel O’Quinn (who represents Galax and Grayson County) called for fines of $250.

  • Keep up the fight for training center's future

    Ever since its closing was announced five years ago, everyone from parents and county leaders to advocacy groups and state legislators have been fighting to prevent the closing of the Southwestern Virginia Training Center in 2018.

    This valiant effort continues, even after years of discouraging results and their pleas falling on mostly deaf ears in Richmond.

  • Reflecting on WCC’s past year

    Dr. Dean Sprinkle is president of Wytheville Community College

    With the start of a new year, it’s timely to reflect on the prior year at Wytheville Community College. I have had the privilege of serving as WCC’s president for the past year and a half, and I have been overwhelmed and humbled by how the college faculty, staff, students and communities have welcomed me and my wife, Janie.

  • Beyond Obamacare

    By Rep. Morgan Griffith

    Every day brings new word of the damage Obamacare has inflicted on our healthcare system. As long as this law is on the books, it will diminish the quality, affordability, and choice of healthcare for everyday Americans.

    In the seven years since Obamacare became law, the promises made by its creators have been broken.

    President Obama told us that we could keep our doctors. You can’t always. President Obama told us we could keep our insurance if we liked it. You can’t.

  • 2016 EDITORIAL AWARDS

    Finding the funny in a year like 2016 was no easy task.

    We lost pop culture icons, endured putrid politics and, locally, suffered through some horrible events.

    The year-end awards editorial is usually a roast of those people and news stories that made us chuckle — Seriously, all those previous award editorials were supposed to be funny. No, really! — but it was a daunting effort this year.

  • Success takes more than leadership; it takes teamwork

    The most memorable part of 2016 (now matter how hard we try to forget) was the highly publicized and at many times, controversial, presidential election. While the results brought about equal parts celebration and panic, we can’t deny that politics on a local level in Grayson County did a better job of bringing people together — even in times of opposition and tragedy.