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Today's News

  • Cuts both ways

    If there are problems in Carroll's emergency services department, they weren't on display as many members of fire and rescue from across the county responded to the Briarleigh Court blaze Jan. 9.

    If one could see behind the firefighters' breathing apparatus, no doubt their faces would show concern for the 37 people living inside the apartment complex. Alongside that emotion, the rescuers' faces also reflected their determination to get everyone out of harm's way.

  • Power to the People

    Some local elderly people are having to decide between paying for electricity, mortgages, medicine or food to survive one of the harshest winters in years, after receiving astronomical electric bills in December from Appalachian Power Co.

    During a town hall meeting at the Rex Theater in downtown Galax last Wednesday, 138 Galax, Grayson and Carroll residents asked APCo how they and others — especially those living paycheck to paycheck — are going to pay their December 2009 electric bills.

  • Nautilus extends closing deadline

    INDEPENDENCE — Nautilus employees have now been told that the plant could shut down in mid-February if a buyer is not found.

    The company provided employees the federally mandated 60-day notice of possible closure last October. The original date of Dec. 18 was extended as the company continued to seek a buyer for its commercial division — including the plant in Independence.

    Last Wednesday, a letter was given to all employees updating them on the process.

  • Sounding the alarm

    HILLSVILLE — Improving Carroll County’s fire and rescue services would benefit from elected officials actually listening to the volunteers, two members of the Emergency Services Board believe.

    ESB Chairwoman Debbie Brady Goad and member Markel Cochran have studied the volunteer emergency services issues since their appointments, but are taken aback by the changes imposed by the Carroll supervisors in January.

  • Take time to gather

    As children, we can’t wait till we are teenagers. Age 16 comes and we can’t wait to be 21. Twenty-one comes and we can’t wait to be 30.

    On it goes, waiting to retire, and even that has been extended.

    Each year we lose someone we care about to death. The gathering for that, too, is growing smaller and smaller.

    In the 1980s, people began wanting a sense of belonging and the search for generations past became a must in nearly every family.

  • Papershapers

    HILLSVILLE — Troops in Afghanistan and Iraq get a regular care package containing greetings from Hillsville with love.

    The return address is "From Our Hearts."

    A senior activities group, crafters known as the Papershakers, at the Carroll Wellness Center becomes a miniature greeting card factory when they meet in the aerobics room every month.

    The group, facilitated by Stampin' Up! crafting demonstrator Karen "Kavi" Coulson, started out making cards with their own hands for their personal use.

  • Planning vs. the status quo

    HILLSVILLE — Having listened patiently to two planners speak for more than two hours about why Carroll County should update its vision for the future, citizen Phillip McCraw used the last few minutes of the kickoff meeting to say what was on his mind.

    Mike Chandler of Chandler Planning and Bruce Peshoff of Planning Works shared the reasons for updating Carroll's comprehensive plan, the goals, the methods and the process on Jan. 14 in the county's high school cafeteria, but McCraw noted he's already experiencing some frustration when it comes to planning issues.

  • Thomas responds to delay

    INDEPENDENCE — Times may be tough fiscally in Grayson County, but school leaders remain optimistic that their facilities improvement plan will save taxpayers money in the long run.

    Earlier this month, the Grayson County Board of Supervisors passed a resolution postponing Phase II of the school system's long-range facilities improvement plan, which includes additions and renovations to Independence Elementary and a new school similar to the one being built in the western end of the county.

  • Celebrating King's Dream

    Churches in the community united on Jan. 17 at Gospel Temple #2 in Galax to commemorate the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the progress in Civil Rights that has been made throughout the years.

    Even though the event is held annually, the black community had something new to celebrate — the election of the first black president.

  • New River 'icebergs' break loose, cause damage

    A campground and several fishing areas have been destroyed along the New River after enormous pieces of ice broke apart and drifted downstream early this week.

    New River Trail State Park rangers are blaming the destruction on wildly shifting temperatures, mixed with near record snowfall last month.

    The area saw anywhere from 12 to 18 inches of snow in December, followed by single digit temperatures for several weeks.