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Today's News

  • Griffith may run for seat in 9th District

    RICHMOND — Republican delegate and Virginia House Majority Leader Morgan Griffith is considering a run for the U.S. House of Representatives seat held by Democrat Rick Boucher of Abingdon.

    Griffith said he has had conversations with people in the district and officials from the National Republican Congressional Committee about challenging Boucher, but is far from making a decision about seeking the seat in the November election.

  • Medicaid cuts looming for hospitals

    Providers could see sharp cuts in Medicaid payments at a time when the need is greater than ever before.

    Virginia's hospitals, such as Twin County Regional, are attempting the delicate balancing act of asking legislators to spare Medicaid from deep cuts, while acknowledging the state faces a significant budget shortfall of $4.2 billion.

    At stake are millions of dollars in payments that go to provide medical care for the poorest Virginians. And it comes at a time when Medicaid's rolls are at a record high.

  • Judge: Dove not guilty

    INDEPENDENCE — A Galax man charged with seven felony counts of taking indecent liberties with a child has been found not guilty in Grayson Circuit Court.

    Grayson County Commonwealth's Attorney Douglas Vaught told The Gazette that David Dove was found not guilty in a bench trial after two full days of testimony.

  • Dogged by detractors, trespassing proposal put down

    HILLSVILLE — No one liked a proposal meant to deal with nuisance dogs, and the Carroll supervisors unanimously buried the idea at their Jan. 11 meeting.

    The proposal would have let people who are harassed by aggressive or nuisance dogs on their own property make a complaint to authorities, and the animal control officer would take action based on the complaint.

    Citizens reacted. In December, several citizens turned out to share their support or displeasure for the idea, even though the public hearing wasn't scheduled until December.

  • School of the future

    On a warm July day back in 2008, Grayson leaders broke ground on the first county school construction program in more than 25 years.

    Superintendent Elizabeth Thomas said that day that "young people deserve a school equipped with the latest technology."

    Former County Administrator Bill Ring stated that with the new facility, students "don't have to take a back seat anymore."

    Seventeen months later, a beautiful school stands where an open field once was, ready to educate the future of Grayson County.

  • Letters to the Editor for 12/28/09

    Smoking a privilege, not a right

    I’ve read the Hotline calls of irate smokers (and one non-smoker) who claim their rights were trampled by the recent law going into effect that bans smoking in restaurants.

    I certainly understand their anger, given how unreasonable it is to ask them to walk 20 feet to the door, open it, and stand in the open air to smoke. How unreasonable!

  • Briarleigh Court in Hillsville burns

    HILLSVILLE — Following the Saturday morning blaze at Briarleigh Court apartments on North Main Street, one resident suffered burns and smoke inhalation and remains hospitalized.

    Emergency officials say that the fire started at about 4:30 a.m. at the apartments owned by Rural Development.

    All 37 residents of the independent living facility for the elderly were accounted for. Three of them had smoke inhalation.

    Resident Emily Bowman remained in good condition at Twin County Regional Hospital Monday after being admitted for treatment.

  • Dept. of Health: Virginia flu levels dropping

    For the first time since mid-September, Virginia has dropped from the list of states that have widespread levels of flu, ending a 15-week run.

    Diane Woolard, division director of the department for surveillance and investigation at the Virginia Department of Health, said the state has reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that Virginia is no longer experiencing widespread levels of flu as of the week ending Jan. 2.

    The levels in Virginia are still higher than normal for this time of year, because of the H1N1 virus, or swine flu.

  • Shock and Awe

    Despite the frigid weather last Thursday, many Twin County residents got hot under the collar.

    That heat was fueled by anger after opening their electric bills.

    While the bills should have been no surprise, given the months of debate about American Electric Power's 14.5 percent base rate increase request, seeing those figures in print was still a shock.

  • Fiscal Foresight

    Foresight is a thing that's refreshing to find in government on any level.

    It's even more rare when desperation seems to run rampant, as it did while officials worked on their finances in the midst of the Great Recession last year.

    But the Carroll County Public Schools leadership managed to both avoid budgetary pitfalls and help prepare to meet future fiscal challenges for 2010.

    The federal government stepped in to help localities avoid crippling layoffs through the recovery act. Many places used this one-time infusion of cash as a short-term fix.