.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Grayson rebids turning lane contract

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County School System will try again to obtain bids to construct two turning lanes at the new Grayson Highlands School in the Grant community.
    A bid opening was held June 8 at the new school, but only two bids were received.
    Chad Newman, director of personnel and operations, said the bids — one from a local contractor and the second from a Wytheville contractor — were not opened because the school system had to have a minimum of three bids.

  • Davis-Bourne Inn closes

    INDEPENDENCE — The owner of the Davis-Bourne Inn has announced that the bed and breakfast will close June 26.
    The inn's restaurant, Journey's End, will remain open through Sunday.
    Owner Taphne Volinskus cited financial reasons for her decision.
    She said she will be selling "personal and business property" through June 27. A list of items will be listed at www.davisbourneinn.net/menu. The inn and its 9.9 acres will be for sale on July 20.

  • Scholarship fund hits $1M milestone

    When the Galax Foundation for Excellence in Education scholarship organization begun in 1987, it awarded two scholarships, worth $500 each, to Galax High School students.
    Today, 23 years since its inception, the foundation reached a milestone of awarding more than $1 million in scholarships on June 7 during an awards ceremony at GHS.

  • Our beliefs are not that different

    Editor's note: On June 10, the Grayson County Board of Supervisors held a zoning hearing to consider The Oracle Institute's request for a special use permit to create a spiritual retreat in the county. The board heard from 29 speakers, most of whom vehemently opposed the idea on religious grounds — which are not to be considered in a zoning hearing. The board rejected the request that night, saying it would be detrimental to citizens' health, safety and welfare.

  • Was denial based on facts or fear?

    Those who visit our area often speak of the warm and inviting atmosphere, the acceptance they feel and the friendly people they meet.
    So, where was that hospitality at last week’s public hearing for a special use permit sought by The Oracle Institute to create a “spiritual community” and learning center in Grayson?

  • Zoning hearing turns into religious debate

    INDEPENDENCE — An application for a special use permit in Grayson County turned into a religious debate on Thursday night, as an estimated 175 citizens turned out for a public hearing regarding a proposed spiritual educational community in the Wilson District.
    The Oracle Institute's plans involved an 11-acre retreat teaching spirituality and ethical environmental practices.

  • Enlightening students about solar energy

    Many construction workers taking building trades classes at the Crossroads Institute have seen the light when it comes to the possibilities of solar energy.
    While educators continue to develop a solar installer certification at Wytheville Community College's Galax campus, those enrolled in the building trades program can already take one of the green and alternative energy course as an elective.
    (See today's related article about the CREATES grant and what it means for the Twin Counties.)

  • Carroll school projects advance

    HILLSVILLE — Citizens who opposed the idea to renovate the high and intermediate schools believed that construction costs would increase taxes, Carroll Supervisor Andy Jackson said at Monday's county board meeting.
    But county officials believe that their financial planning — combined with several other favorable factors — means that the county will be able to afford the facilities program without a tax increase.

  • Speakers at Carroll hearing support Phase III school plans

    All speakers at a June 14 public hearing with the Carroll Board of Supervisors supported moving ahead with Phase III renovations instead of building new schools.
    Chip Neely said he supported the plans for Phase III because the alternative is too costly. “In talking with the community as a minister, the economic stress of new construction is not feasible.”
    Donnie Morgan, who has three children in the county school system, said he's in favor of Phase III “if it's done right. I'm not for frills, like at the elementary schools.”

  • County: tax increase 'unavoidable' in Grayson

    INDEPENDENCE — County administration called a 44 percent real estate tax increase “unavoidable” in Grayson County during a public hearing last Thursday night on the proposed 2010-11 county budget.
    More than 30 people hung around until just after 11 p.m. last week as supervisors prepared to hold a public hearing on the upcoming budget, which includes a proposed tax rate of 49 cents per $100.
    While only 13 of those in attendance spoke, many pleaded with the board to cut the budget some more instead of raising taxes during these tough economic times.