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Today's News

  • Inventor hopes to seal deal for pavement-patching product

    Ron Gorton's new business is all about creating bonds.
    In the pursuit of developing his "Fusion Plus" product, Gorton has formed a relationship with the business developers at the Crossroads Institute in Galax.
    The other indispensable bond takes place at a molecular level, because Fusion Plus is meant to be a durable, year-round and affordable fix for cracked pavement.
    Fusion Plus has all kinds of potential applications, but Gorton wants to work with localities and departments of transportation to develop a way to keep the roads in good shape.

  • Schools will serve as collateral for Phase I loan

    INDEPENDENCE — A motion to use the two schools included in Phase I of Grayson’s long-term facilities improvement plan as collateral for an extended loan was nearly defeated after two board members disagreed with the idea.
    Dennis Howard, senior vice president of SunTrust Bank, attended the Grayson School Board meeting last Monday night to explain the plan.

  • Projects apply for state funding

    Three Twin County projects have applied to the Virginia Tobacco Commission for more than $3 million in funding to move the economic, education and community development efforts forward.
    Two of the applications originated with projects at the Crossroads Institute, including the now-familiar effort to develop the Wildwood Commerce Park at Interstate 77's Exit 19 in Carroll County.
    That application requests a grant of $2.5 million to further prepare the site for business and industry.

  • Trooper Cochran honored for bravery

    RICHMOND — A Galax state trooper has received the highest award given out by the Virginia State Police for his response to the Briarleigh Court apartments fire Jan. 9.

  • Girl Scout working to improve domestic violence victims' lives

    HILLSVILLE — A Girl Scout working on her Gold Award recently launched a project to help victims of domestic violence at the Family Resource Center in Wytheville.

  • Town calls for Hillsville Rescue to disband

    HILLSVILLE — The Hillsville Rescue Squad has been given up for dead as town officials end their attempts to resuscitate the long-shuttered volunteer emergency medical service.
    Carroll County and Hillsville officials moved to close the rescue squad about eight years ago, after learning the captain had inappropriately used an ambulance to move furniture from Marion to an apartment in town.

  • Grayson rebids turning lane contract

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County School System will try again to obtain bids to construct two turning lanes at the new Grayson Highlands School in the Grant community.
    A bid opening was held June 8 at the new school, but only two bids were received.
    Chad Newman, director of personnel and operations, said the bids — one from a local contractor and the second from a Wytheville contractor — were not opened because the school system had to have a minimum of three bids.

  • Davis-Bourne Inn closes

    INDEPENDENCE — The owner of the Davis-Bourne Inn has announced that the bed and breakfast will close June 26.
    The inn's restaurant, Journey's End, will remain open through Sunday.
    Owner Taphne Volinskus cited financial reasons for her decision.
    She said she will be selling "personal and business property" through June 27. A list of items will be listed at www.davisbourneinn.net/menu. The inn and its 9.9 acres will be for sale on July 20.

  • Scholarship fund hits $1M milestone

    When the Galax Foundation for Excellence in Education scholarship organization begun in 1987, it awarded two scholarships, worth $500 each, to Galax High School students.
    Today, 23 years since its inception, the foundation reached a milestone of awarding more than $1 million in scholarships on June 7 during an awards ceremony at GHS.

  • Our beliefs are not that different

    Editor's note: On June 10, the Grayson County Board of Supervisors held a zoning hearing to consider The Oracle Institute's request for a special use permit to create a spiritual retreat in the county. The board heard from 29 speakers, most of whom vehemently opposed the idea on religious grounds — which are not to be considered in a zoning hearing. The board rejected the request that night, saying it would be detrimental to citizens' health, safety and welfare.