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Today's News

  • Turns one

    Westin Michael Johnson of Galax celebrated his first birthday Dec. 5 with a Mickey Mouse party. He is the son of Michael and Kasey Johnson.

    His grandparents are David and Pam Flippin, Bert and Carol Elliott of Galax. His great-grandparents are Dennis and Helen Flippin of Lowgap, N.C., and Lilly Mae Melton of Galax.

  • It's about time

    For too long, the residents of Givens Street and the surrounding neighborhoods in Galax have been forced to live in a water-logged past that ended for most of the city in the 1940s, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers rerouted and reinforced Chestnut Creek to prevent frequent floods that often washed away the low-lying areas.
    In recent years — most notably in 2007 and most recently last summer — residents of these neighborhoods were surrounded by backed-up flood waters caused by inadequate and dilapidated stormwater drainage systems.

  • Electricity rate hikes expected

    The new president of Appalachian Power Co. told a group of regional leaders recently that while electricity rates have recently dipped, rate increases are on the horizon as the utility faces the costs of meeting environmental regulations.
    Charles Patton, who was named president and chief operating officer in the summer, said Appalachian will file a new rate application with the State Corporation Commission by March 31 but it was too soon to discuss details.

  • Opticom system gets green light

    A preemption device on traffic signals along Main Street, East Stuart Drive and Meadow Street in Galax would make intersections safer for police, fire engines, ambulances and other traffic when emergency personnel are responding.

    The fire department has tried unsuccessfully for years to land a grant for the Opticom system, but now a pool of leftover highway funds will finally allow Galax to put the equipment in place.
    Opticom is a traffic control system that provides a green light — or intersection right-of-way — to emergency vehicles.

  • Fuel Farm

     

  • Stanford didn’t let it go to its head

     You knew it was going to be a long night when you saw the helmets.

    Those orange hats Virginia Tech broke out for Monday’s Orange Bowl weren’t as bad as the ones Miami wore against the Hokies during the regular season – you know, the green ones that looked like they should have been buzzing around something left in the barnyard – but they were bad enough.

  • Grayson County girls barely miss chance at first victory

     INDEPENDENCE –– Grayson County came within a whisker of snapping a 42-game losing streak but fell to Holston 39-37 in a nondistrict girls’ basketball game Wednesday.

    Holston (4-5), which had ended its own string of 100-plus straight defeats earlier in the year, took a two-point lead on Faith Ritchie’s free throw with 18 seconds remaining.

    Grayson County (0-7) had a chance to send the game into overtime but was off the mark at the buzzer.

  • Veterans clinic in Hillsville to close

    Updated 6:07 p.m.

    SALEM — The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center at Salem announced Friday that the outpatient clinic in Hillsville will soon be consolidated with a new facility in Wytheville.

    Construction at the Wytheville Community Based Outpatient Clinic continues and remains on schedule for a spring opening, VA officials said in a news release. The new clinic will have 9,500 square feet of space and will have the capacity to serve more than 5,000 veterans.

  • Grayson County-Galax put on ice

    The basketball quad pitting Grayson County at Galax has been postponed due to the weather. No make-up date has been announced as of Friday afternoon.

    Also, the Carroll County-Tazewell quad has been postponed.

  • State police facing shortage

    The arrival of a new year is typically seen as a time of positive change, but as 2011 dawns, state police officials are braced for what they see as a bad situation about to get worse, even in Southwest Virginia.
    On Jan. 1, their sworn ranks of 262 uniformed personnel are scheduled to shrink by another 13 across the state because of retirements. That drop comes at a time when officials say their numbers are already too lean.