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Today's News

  • Public Record for 6/23/10 Edition

    Editor’s Note: This information is taken from open court records and is a matter of public record. The listings are complete. The newspaper, as a matter of fairness, will not honor requests to omit any listing. 
    For information on this column or questions, 236-5178, ext. 213.

    Land Transfers
    These land transfers were recorded March 24-April 23 in the office of Susan M. Herrington, clerk of the Grayson County Circuit Court, Independence:

  • Artist shows Parkway pride

    Todd Price of Elk Creek is the winner of the People's Choice Award for the Chestnut Creek School of the Arts' “Memories: The Blue Ridge Parkway in Retrospect” juried art show, which exhibited mid-April through mid-June in the lobby at CCSA.

  • Fries gets $1 million for downtown

    FRIES — The Fries Downtown Revitalization Project is among 24 projects in Virginia receiving a total of $12 million in funds from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.
    The town will receive a grant of $1 million.

  • Independence gears up for July 4th

    INDEPENDENCE — The Town of Independence will host its annual Fourth of July celebration with two days of activities Friday and Saturday.
    Crafts, food and drink vendors will open noon Friday and 9 a.m. Saturday at the McKnight Lot, located at the intersection of U.S. 58/U.S. 21 and the Historic 1908 Courthouse.

  • Carroll ESB member resigns

    HILLSVILLE — Citing poor emergency billing practices that burden the taxpayers, a member of the Carroll Emergency Services Advisory Board has resigned.
    Debby Brady Goad turned in her letter of resignation at last Thursday's advisory board meeting.
    In her time on the board, which included a term as chairwoman, Goad continually stressed the importance of making the “soft billing” for emergency medical services — billing insurance carriers, not patients — as efficient as possible for volunteer rescue and Carroll EMS.

  • Water Authority told: Flouride bad for health

    A Sparta, N.C., man told members of the Va./N.C. Water Authority on June 10 that fluoride was listed as toxic in some studies and is harmful to your health.
    Tom Keepfer distributed information packets about the alleged hazards of fluoride. In some cases, he said, fluoride has led to deaths from poisoning.
    The Water Authority plans to use fluoride in the treatment of the water that will flow to customers from Sparta to Independence.

  • Grayson's Million Dollar Miracle

    INDEPENDENCE —  After attending budget meetings this year, Grayson County teacher Janet Mullins woke up in the middle of the night with an idea.
    As you'd expect from a math teacher, it was a number.
    “I have to raise $1 million,” Mullins realized.

  • A park of their own

    LAMBSBURG — Neighborhood residents feel like they have a place to go for recreation, now that the Lambsburg community group has added the Frank Hawks Memorial Park at the former elementary school.
    The old expanse of asphalt has been patched, painted and transformed into a standard-sized tennis court and a regulation basketball court with a new 14-by-24-foot picnic shelter nearby. New swings and playground equipment stand in a shock-absorbing bed of sand — ready for use for those willing to brave the summer heat.

  • Program targets criminal aliens

    RICHMOND — U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced that its Secure Communities initiative now has been activated in every county in the Commonwealth of Virginia.
    This biometric information-sharing strategy enables ICE to identify any alien booked into local law enforcement’s custody for a crime. This is part of ICE’s strategy to improve and modernize the identification of criminal aliens and their removal from the United States.

  • Grayson raises real estate tax levy

    INDEPENDENCE – To the displeasure of nearly a dozen citizens in attendance, the Grayson County board of supervisors approved a 44 percent increase in real estate taxes last Wednesday night after months of meetings and work sessions.
    Last week, the county administrator called the tax increase — part of a $20.5 million budget — “unavoidable,” as dozens of citizens turned out and spoke in protest of the change.