Local News

  • Carrico: board's vote on Oracle Institute was wrong

    INDEPENDENCE — The most heated zoning debate in Grayson County this year will be re-visited in 12 months after supervisors voted last week to re-consider an application for a spiritual education center in the western end of the county.
    Last month, supervisors denied an application for a special use permit in the Wilson District to build a spiritual education community known as the Oracle Institute.

  • Group studies how to slow power rate increases

    RICHMOND— An unofficial work group created by state Del. Ward Armstrong of Henry County continues to discuss ways to contain increases in electricity rates.
    The group met for a second time June 29, and after several hours of discussion, it may not go the route of proposing radical changes to a 2007 law that established a new regulatory scheme for Virginia's electric utilities.

  • New state laws in effect

    In a year dominated by a $4 million budget shortfall, state lawmakers still managed to pass roughly 900 bills that took effect on July 1. The measures run the gamut from seat belts to guns to the promotion of offshore drilling to economic development.
    Here’s a selection of the highlights:

    Lawmakers approved several measures this year amending gun ownership rules.

  • Putting wind to work (VIDEO)

     FANCY GAP — The windmill-raising Thursday on Gary Horton's farm generated lots of interest in the community for the first attempt to make commercial-grade renewable energy in Carroll County.

    Dozens of people, including Virginia state Senator Roscoe Reynolds and business developers Dallas Garrett and Bernie Deck, showed up on the farm on the ridge to see what happened with the windmill installation by Red Hill General Store.


    We've been working for several weeks to prepare this brand new online experience for readers of The Gazette, and we hope you like the improvements.

  • Lt. Gov. Bolling visits, brings gift

    Job creation is not just a concern, it is the top priority of this legislative session, said Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling, Virginia's chief job creation officer, who visited with local officials and others at the Crossroads Institute on Tuesday to learn about local development and regional efforts in Grayson and Carroll counties and Galax.
    On a three-day trip across Southwest Virginia, Bolling said through his travels he has “been listening and learning to help get the economy moving again.”

  • Griffith wants debates with Boucher

    Republican congressional hopeful Morgan Griffith challenged incumbent U.S. Rep. Rick Boucher to a series of debates to take place in all 27 cities and counties in the 9th Congressional District.
    “The people deserve to hear their candidates for Congress debate so that they can make an informed decision on who is the best fit to serve them in Washington,” wrote Griffith, the Virginia House majority leader, in an open letter to Boucher that was also sent to news outlets.

  • Fries gets $1 million for downtown

    FRIES — The Fries Downtown Revitalization Project is among 24 projects in Virginia receiving a total of $12 million in funds from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program.
    The town will receive a grant of $1 million.

  • Water Authority told: Flouride bad for health

    A Sparta, N.C., man told members of the Va./N.C. Water Authority on June 10 that fluoride was listed as toxic in some studies and is harmful to your health.
    Tom Keepfer distributed information packets about the alleged hazards of fluoride. In some cases, he said, fluoride has led to deaths from poisoning.
    The Water Authority plans to use fluoride in the treatment of the water that will flow to customers from Sparta to Independence.

  • Grayson raises real estate tax levy

    INDEPENDENCE – To the displeasure of nearly a dozen citizens in attendance, the Grayson County board of supervisors approved a 44 percent increase in real estate taxes last Wednesday night after months of meetings and work sessions.
    Last week, the county administrator called the tax increase — part of a $20.5 million budget — “unavoidable,” as dozens of citizens turned out and spoke in protest of the change.