Local News

  • Drug conspiracy defendant found dead before sentencing

    FRIES — A 53-year-old Galax man, who pleaded guilty to illegal drug charges in U.S. District Court and who faced a potential 10-year stint in federal prison, was found dead Tuesday.
    Police say Donald Scott Vaughan's death was self-inflicted.

    Vaughan faced charges in both state and federal courts after police set up a multi-agency drug bust at Interstate 77 Exit 14 last April.
    Carroll deputies arrested Vaughan after the suspect left the scene at high speeds through areas of Woodlawn and the Laurel sections of the county to the Galax area.

  • Littrell to lead Carroll supervisors

    HILLSVILLE — Carroll supervisors made their 2010 vice chair the 2011 chairman and shifted the start of their regular meetings to one hour earlier at their organizational meeting Monday.
    The supervisors met briefly first thing and unanimously promoted Tom Littrell to the chairman's position.
    Having turned the meeting over to the county administrator, outgoing Chairman Wes Hurst made Littrell's nomination.

  • Prosecutor will seek re-election

    HILLSVILLE — As the filing date for the Carroll County Republican Primary nears, the commonwealth's attorney has announced his intention to run for re-election.
    Greg Goad has served as commonwealth's attorney of Carroll County for nearly 20 years.

    Filing for the May 21 preferential primary begins Jan. 10 at noon.
    Registration will continue until Jan. 24 at noon.
    "I'll be seeking my sixth four-year term," Goad said.

  • Prison in deep freeze

    INDEPENDENCE — As John Garman walks the hallways and cellblocks of Virginia's newest prison, he is met at every turn by eerie silence.
    Prisons are noisy places, and by now this sprawling, 1,024-bed complex should be a cacophony of buzzing electronic gates, metal clanking on metal, and hundreds of voices raised above the din.

  • Broccoli could be cash crop

    HILLSVILLE — Already fertile ground for about 150 acres of broccoli, local farmers will participate in an effort to grow a heat tolerant variety that will supply the vegetable to the East Coast.

    Virginia Cooperative Extension Agent Wythe Morris will work with a team of researchers headed by Cornell University to ramp up production here, instead of transporting about 90 percent of broccoli that ends up in stores across the country.

  • Citizen alleges conflict


    Click on the links at the end of this story to view original documents, including the property deed, Gary Larrowe's financial disclosures and minutes of the Blue Ridge Crossroads Economic Development Authority meetings. Also, click on the video link to see Mike Goldwasser speaking at the December meeting of the Carroll County Board of Supervisors.

  • Anti-fluoride group asks Grayson to omit chemical

    INDEPENDENCE — To fluoridate or not to fluoridate? That is the question Grayson County leaders will have to make in the coming weeks for a new water system that will serve the towns of Independence and Sparta, N.C.
    After citizens showed up in masses to both Alleghany County Commissioners and Sparta Town Council with 1,000-plus signatures on a petition against fluoridation, both N.C. governments voted against the procedure for the new water system being developed by the Virginia-Carolina Regional Water Authority.

  • City to address housing, flooding

    Since the city has wrapped up the downtown revitalization project, construction of Chestnut Creek School of the Arts, the permanent stage in Felts Park and other projects, it has begun looking into funding for improving the Givens/Shaw/Barger street areas.

    The city plans to seek Community Development Block Grants through the Department of Housing and Community Development and funding through other agencies.

  • Boucher looks back on 28 years of service

    For 28 years, U.S. Rep. Rick Boucher divided his time between the mountains of Southwest Virginia and the ornate buildings on Capitol Hill.
    By all accounts, the long-serving congressman's roots and life in the 9th District thoroughly influenced his work in Washington — and vice versa.

    Boucher was known on Capitol Hill for his work on the cutting edge of technology and telecommunications, and he consistently tried to use that knowledge to build a 21st century economy in Southwest Virginia.




    Results will appear in the Jan. 7, 2011 edition of The Gazette.