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Local News

  • Va. to stagger food stamp payouts to ease crowding

    The first of every month, about 440,000 households in the state get their monthly allotment of food stamps — now known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits — and many promptly head to their local grocery stores.
    Checkout lines can be much longer. Items such as Cheerios and broccoli can disappear from shelves. Some stores bring in extra staff.
    Only nine states do business this way.

  • Hillsville hears water bill concerns

    HILLSVILLE — Monday’s first meeting of a town council with two new members and an interim town manager got off to a smooth start, a marked contrast from the boisterous meetings of the past couple of months.
    The “new” Hillsville Town Council — three veterans and two newcomers — heard many of the same issues from citizens as the “old” council, including concerns about water billing for an apartment with multiple tenants and only one meter.

  • Green Team wants Carroll school system to cut back on waste — with video

    HILLSVILLE  — Hoping to prevent more scenes of bulldozers shoving huge piles of cardboard into the landfill, the advisors for the Carroll High Green Team want the school system as a whole to recycle more.
    Educator Brittany Scott made this request to the school board at its regular July meeting Tuesday, encouraging the elected officials to think of it as a money saver and teaching tool.

  • Youth detention center seen as outdated

    CHRISTIANSBURG — The superintendent of the New River Valley’s youth lockup is making a public case to modernize the building to address serious security, operational and legal risks.
    Joe Young said public schools and government buildings have more advanced security features than the New River Valley Juvenile Detention Home in Christiansburg, a designated maximum-security lockup for boys and girls age 7 to 17.

  • County one step closer to providing natural gas

    HILLSVILLE — With approval of an interconnectivity agreement with utility company East Tennessee Natural Gas, the Carroll County Industrial Development Authority came another step closer to bringing fuel through the pipeline and into the community.
    IDA members in May, after working with Roanoke Gas Company, found a feasible plan to tap the Patriot natural gas pipeline in order to supply the fuel to the Mohawk plant in Hillsville for the estimated cost of $1.5 to $1.8 million.

  • Hillsville leaders' first day was a stormy one

    HILLSVILLE — The town’s new mayor, new council member, interim town manager and acting police chief all had a stormy beginning to their tenures on July 1.
    Their first official day in office was the same day a storm ripped through Hillsville, knocking over trees and power lines and leaving thousands in the town and Carroll County without electricity.
    They weathered the storm, but town officials agreed Monday that things would go smoother with a more detailed emergency management plan.

  • Training center fight isn't over

    HILLSVILLE  — A local parent still hopes that there’s room for a compromise in the planned closures of training centers for the intellectually and developmentally disabled.
    Parent advocate Wanda Robinson pointed out that the final ruling in a settlement agreement between Virginia and the Department of Justice in federal court has not reached its conclusion yet.

  • Grayson trashes penalty

    INDEPENDENCE – Grayson County citizens will no longer face a criminal charge for non-payment of their trash collection fee, after supervisors made additional changes to the county’s subdivision ordinance.
    Supervisor Mike Maynard said after talking with the county’s attorney, following the public hearing last month, that there were some additional language changes the board should consider.
    During the public hearing, citizens spoke out about the fact that, if they violated the ordinance, they could potentially be charged with a misdemeanor.

  • After The Storm: Preparing for next time

    Last week, the area experienced storms with high winds that caused a lot of damage and left thousands without electricity. Summer is just getting started, so it’s likely that we’ll see more severe weather in the coming months.
    Galax Police Chief Rick Clark is sharing some advice from the Virginia Department of Emergency Management about planning for the next storm.
    “The National Weather Service estimates that winds have to blow between 50 and 70 mph to cause the damage we experienced,” Clark said.

  • APCo deals with 'major historical disaster'

    Appalachian Power Co. crews worked hard to restore power to Twin County customers on Wednesday, but some homes were expected to be without power until today, Friday, or later.
    APCo’s president, Charles Patton, said the long waits for power restoration can be attributed to the size of the storm and the availability of help from contractors.
    Charles Patton toured the company’s Virginia and West Virginia coverage areas on Monday.