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Local News

  • Regional jail members want more state funding

    DUBLIN — It has been two years since the eight localities that are members of the New River Valley Regional Jail authority stopped paying for state-responsible inmates. And now they’re asking state legislators to move those inmates out of the jail or pay up.
    Until December 2010, the localities — consisting of the counties of Pulaski, Giles, Carroll, Wythe, Grayson, Bland and Floyd and the city of Radford — were paying for state inmates that were being housed in the jail because state facilities did not have room for them.

  • Many living without basic needs

    By SHAINA STOCKTON
    Staff

    To make sure all area residents have the opportunity for a healthy living environment, Rooftop of Virginia offers help through an Indoor Plumbing and Rehabilitation Program.
    The goal is to provide assistance to locals who either do not have indoor plumbing or have failing water delivery or waste disposal systems.
    “We believe that everyone should be entitled to a home that fulfills basic human needs,” said program coordinator Opal Kegley.

  • Fries birding trail plans move forward

    FRIES — A proposed birding trail in Fries is moving forward, as town council members learned at their Dec. 4 meeting.
    In November, organizers of the trail brought their plan to council, but town officials were reluctant to give approval without some clarification that a state transportation grant could be used for the project.
    Council received a response from consultants the Lane Group concerning the status of the $185,000 Virginia Department of Transportation grant for a birding trail and river walk.

  • Galax applies for more Safe Routes funding

    The city is working to improve sidewalks and increase health and safety for students.

  • Grayson budget on track

    INDEPENDENCE — Halfway through the county’s fiscal year, Grayson has expended 41 percent of its budgeted dollars.
    That number, however, could be misleading as expenses could still be on the horizon.
    At the board of supervisors’ December meeting, County Administrator Jonathan Sweet pointed out that, at the mid-point in the budget year, only three departments are overspent — the electoral board, circuit court and local support.

  • Citizens take aim at firing range

    INDEPENDENCE — Grayson citizens continue to reload their ammunition as the county continues its pursuit of a public shooting range near the old landfill site.
    Four citizens spoke in opposition of the proposed location during a public comments period at the Grayson Board of Supervisors meeting on Dec. 13.
    Tony Goodman spoke first and, although his home is in Baywood, he owns land adjacent to the proposed location.

  • Dreaming of a white Christmas?

    By KEVIN MYATT
    Landmark News Service

    The United States is going to be whiter on Christmas than it has been so far in a generally mild December.
    But it doesn’t appear likely the New River and Roanoke valleys will be part of that.
    Historically, about 10 percent to 15 percent of Christmases are white in our region. However, two of the past three have been, following the National Weather Service definition of having at least 1 inch of snow on the ground.

  • Final water agreement reached with Mount Airy

    HILLSVILLE — Carroll County Public Service Authority officials treated Mount Airy, N.C.’s approval of a long-sought water agreement as an early Christmas present.
    During his project updates at the short meeting last Wednesday, County Administrator Gary Larrowe confirmed that the effort to work with the North Carolina city to supply Interstate 77’s Exit 1 with water has come to fruition.

  • Governor sets aside $14.3M to open prison

    In a budget amendment, Gov. Bob McDonnell calls for Grayson County prison to be open and at full capacity by January 2014.

  • Windmill ban could chill development

    HILLSVILLE — Language meant to prohibit wind turbines in Carroll may have the unintended consequence of chilling economic development, county officials discussed while considering a draft ordinance last Wednesday.
    An idea by EDP Renewables to study a wind farm on Stoots Mountain caused neighbors and other citizens some concerns, which were shared at several meetings with the Carroll Board of Supervisors.
    The wind farm could have as many as 24 turbines that reach nearly 500 feet tall.