• Grayson appropriates school funds

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County Board of Supervisors approved an appropriation of $1.6 million dollars for the school system at its Feb. 11 meeting.

    The supervisors appropriate funds for the school board on a monthly, categorical basis. The request provides both boards with an organized and public list showing where the funds are going in the system.

    In the breakdown presented by Grayson Schools Superintendent Kelly Wilmore, $1.15 million of the requests will benefit school instruction. The remaining balance will be divided as follows:

  • School projects underway, more to come

    INDEPENDENCE — New outdoor bleachers, fresh coats of paint and lighting replacements are just a few of the projects currently underway at Grayson County High School. Without missing a beat, staff spent last week taking full advantage of the school closings (brought on by extremely low temperatures and hazardous back roads) by filing the hallways with buckets of paint, rollers and drop cloths.

  • Policy change creates career education opportunities

    Galax City Schools are happy at the passing of the Every Student Succeeds Act, according to Superintendent Bill Sturgill.

    The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), signed into law by President Barack Obama in December 2015, replaces the older and much more strict No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), which went into effect in 2002 under former President George W. Bush.

  • Carroll school board chooses leaders, moves meeting day

    HILLSVILLE – The Carroll County School Board has changed the day of its monthly meeting and elected its 2016 chair and vice-chair.

    Brian Spencer has been elected as chairman and Joey Haynes will serve as vice chairman.

    In the school board organizational meeting, held on Jan. 14, the board decided to change its meetings from Thursday evening to Tuesday evening. The board will meet on the second Tuesday of each month starting at 5:30 p.m. Citizen comments will be heard at 6 p.m.

  • Renovations part of 2016 Grayson school plan

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County School Board held its first meeting of 2016 last week, where members looked ahead to projects for the new year that include renovations to the high school and other facilities.

    Schools Superintendent Kelly Wilmore shared a presentation with the board at the Jan. 11 meeting, outlining several projects for the upcoming year and previewing school budget meeting dates.

  • Governor announces $1 billion for schools

    Staff Report

    Gov. Terry McAuliffe has announced an ambitious budget package for Virginia’s public schools, which combined with higher education announcements includes an investment of more than $1 billion.

    The plan includes money for 2,500 new teachers, educational staff raises, funding for early childhood education and support for at-risk students.

  • Volunteers to undertake GCHS bleacher removal

    INDEPENDENCE — A packed house of supporters for Grayson County schools discussed a plan to remove the 40-year-old concrete bleachers at the football field during a town hall meeting last week in the Grayson County Courthouse board room.

    The group of volunteers developed a preliminary plan on how to safely remove the bleachers, which have been deemed unsafe.

  • Grayson thanks departing school board members

    INDEPENDENCE — The Grayson County School Board concluded its 2015 business at the Dec. 14 meeting, where present members of the school board and new Schools Superintendent Kelly Wilmore thanked departing members for their service.

    “I am overpowered by the dedication of service from the people on this board,” said School Board Chair Larry Bartlett, who is stepping down Dec. 31. “I am appreciative of the friendships, and their willingness to work with [each other], and their dedication to our kids.”

  • Cuts create challenges for Grayson schools

    INDEPENDENCE — During school budget sessions over the past several years, school superintendents and school boards throughout the Twin Counties expressed the same concerns: due to state cuts in education, it’s becoming more and more difficult to come up with county school budgets that are fair to their staff and students.

  • Report: school funding stretched to limit


    A survey conducted this past spring by the Virginia Association of School Superintendents (VASS) revealed that drastic reductions in state funding for public education and maximum efforts by localities to replace lost funds have pushed Virginia’s schools to the limits of their human and financial capacity in their attempts to meet today’s expectations and serve the needs of students.