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Education

  • Schools to sell surplus property

    HILLSVILLE — The Carroll School Board will accept sealed bids on about four acres behind the former Hillsville elementary school on Oak Street, and the proceeds will go towards school improvements.
    The school board made the decision at Tuesday's meeting, after holding a public hearing during which no citizens spoke.
    This involves three pieces of land, consisting of tracts of 1.861 acres, 2.09 acres and .25 acres, according to information from the school board.

  • 'Everyday Math' family nights to be held

    HILLSVILLE — Carroll County Public School students are learning math using a different, more exciting way this year.

  • White: WCC has no plans to leave Galax

    HILLSVILLE — The Wytheville Community College president has denied that the college is moving out of the area, calling it a false rumor.
    WCC President Charlie White took time out of his appearance in front of the Carroll Board of Supervisors Aug. 10 to assure county officials that WCC isn't leaving the Twin Counties.
    He's not sure where the rumor is coming from, but the talk is that the community college no longer wants to remain in the educational and business development facility in Galax known as the Crossroads Institute.

  • Math class teaches real world skills

    HILLSVILLE — Just back to school, fifth-grade math students at Hillsville Elementary practiced writing out “six to the fourth power” exponentially, and third graders estimated the money they would need and calculated the change they’d get back while buying school supplies.

  • Renovations won't improve older spaces

    HILLSVILLE — Most of the funds for the Phase III schools construction project will go toward adding new spaces to Carroll Intermediate and High schools.
    Not much will be left over to improve the older spaces.
    Carroll School Board members seemed worried during a presentation at their Aug. 10 meeting that some important renovation work would be left out of the $26.7 million project.

  • Most schools meet AYP targets

    It was a tough year for Virginia schools, as the state as a whole failed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress targets for the 2009-10 school year, according to data released Aug. 12 by the Virginia Department of Education.
    No local school divisions met the criteria, either, though the majority of individual schools did in the City of Galax and Carroll and Grayson counties.

  • New year brings new library, tech upgrades

    Galax Elementary School students were greeted this year with a renovated library and two new computer labs paid for with stimulus funds Galax schools received.
    “We've been successful with adequate yearly progress, and we're just trying to go beyond that,” said GES Principal Brian Stuart. “We're just trying to become modern, even if we are in an old building. We're excited.”

  • Woodlawn School's future uncertain

    Even aging school buildings have potential reuses, and Carroll officials want to explore possibilities for Woodlawn once educators and students vacate the facility.
    If nothing else, Woodlawn School — founded more than 100 years ago — sits on real estate that could provide ballfields or even a water park, believes Sam Dickson, the county's at-large supervisor.

  • New school lacks ballfield, playground

    Grayson Highlands School opened Aug. 16, but it was without a playground or ball field — and that worries at least one parent and some school board members.
    Grayson County School Board Vice Chairman Shannon Holdaway said during a meeting Aug. 9 that the school system needs to grade and level land at the school for a ball field.

  • Grayson Highlands open at last

    An open house and ribbon cutting was held at the new Grayson Highlands School in the Grant community Aug. 3, giving students, parents and members of the community the opportunity to tour the new facility.
    School Superintendent Dr. Elizabeth Thomas said this was the first new school built in the Wilson District since 1930.