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Education

  • Schools solve bus loading dilemma

    INDEPENDENCE — Recent updates were made to Independence Elementary and the middle and high schools’ bus parking lots by the Grayson County Public Schools transportation department, allowing for smoother loading and departure at the end of the school day.

    During the Grayson County School Board’s Feb. 13 meeting, Charles Dickson of the school system’s transportation department, gave a brief summary of what had been done to improve the traffic from the parking lot.

  • Mandate's end won't affect Grayson transgender policy

    INDEPENDENCE — A recent announcement from President Donald Trump’s administration was a new development in an ongoing debate about transgender rights involving restrooms; one that reached the levels of the local government last year.

  • GES project could require tax increase

    Galax could refinance debt and raise the tax levy to pay for a proposed $17 million expansion of the elementary school.

    At a Feb. 13 joint meeting with Galax City Council and the Galax City School Board, accounting firm Davenport & Company gave a presentation on how the funding for the Galax Elementary School renovation and upgrade might be achieved.

  • Drivers urged to 'Zone In' near Galax schools

    Staff Report

    Galax students and parents dropping them off at school may not be aware that, just a few blocks from the campuses, Galax Safe Routes to School has yard signs posted in the Parkwood Street neighborhood urging drivers to “Slow Down! Keep our kids safe,” and the message behind it goes deep.

  • GOING VIRAL: flu empties local classrooms

    The dreaded flu virus has declared open season in the Twin Counties, and some school systems in the area are feeling the effects with more absences than normal.

    In the past week, Carroll County Public Schools saw a large number of student absences, climbing into the hundreds for a few schools inside the division.

    “We noticed an increase in absences on [Feb. 9-10], but not nearly as bad as the last two days,” Schools Superintendent Strader Blankenship told The Gazette on Tuesday.

  • Galax looks ahead to budget challenges

    Galax schools will face a budget challenge this year.

    At the Jan. 10 Galax City School Board meeting, Superintendent Bill Sturgill noted that there is “close to a $300,000 hurdle” to get over already in the budget, due to the rising cost of Virginia Retirement System contributions and Gov. Terry McAuliffe’s financial supplement (with a local funding match) being taken away.

  • Grant paying for playground equipment for special needs students

    INDEPENDENCE ― Grayson County Public Schools recently received a grant from United Way Southwest Virginia for $5,000, to use in inclusive projects for students with special needs.

    The grant money will pay for recreational equipment that can be enjoyed by students with and without special needs at Fairview Elementary School; where they will also soon have an inclusive play area to enjoy together.

  • Taylor directs traffic, sends students in positive direction

    Officer Vickie Taylor received an accolade just in time for Crossing Guard Appreciation Day; she was given one of Virginia’s Most Outstanding Crossing Guard Awards for 2016, one of six such officers to receive the award out of 71 nominations.

    “I love you, but I’ll correct you,” is a motto of sorts for Taylor, a 15-year veteran of the Galax City Police Department and a school resource officer for 13 years.

  • King remembered as inspirational teacher

    Like many students before him at Galax High School, Travis Newman had heard the stories from upperclassmen about Judy King.

    He was warned about the strict red-haired English and U.S. History teacher, a tough-as-nails educator who didn’t suffer foolishness and demanded only the best from her class.

    Newman recalls entering her English classroom with dread, “but I learned quickly that what people hated about her classes was that she cared — and she expected her students to care, as well. This was not a class that you could breeze through.”

  • Teachers left out of pay raise proposal

    Landmark News Service

    RICHMOND — State employees may just get Christmas in July in the form of a 3 percent raise.

    Republican budget leaders from both chambers of the General Assembly announced the pay increase, plus a 17 percent higher starting salary for Virginia State Police troopers and a way to address salary compression for sheriff’s deputies.