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Business

  • Broccoli industry could boom for local farmers

    Carroll County has been chosen for field testing in plans by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to invest millions of dollars to build a network of broccoli growers and markets on the east coast.
    Most of the broccoli sold on the east coast is grown in California and Arizona and trucked east, arriving in stores as many as 10 days after harvest. USDA wants to bring locally-grown broccoli closer to consumers.

  • Virginia hands out millions to big business

    RICHMOND — When Gov. Bob McDonnell testified before a congressional committee in Washington last week about Virginia's efforts to rebound from the national recession, he focused on entrepreneurs and small business.
    "I firmly believe it is the entrepreneur who makes businesses grow and prosper — not the government," he said.
    He called small businesses "the backbone of our economy."
    But McDonnell has placed government aid front and center in his campaign to reinvigorate the state's economy.

  • Wildwood price, need questioned

    HILLSVILLE — Though a Carroll citizen has heard a lot about the planned business commerce park known as Wildwood, she hadn't heard how much the public-private development at Interstate 77's Exit 19 would cost.
    Debbie Brady Goad asked that and more at the Carroll Board of Supervisors' meeting Jan. 13.
    "I want to get just a few things together and get it in my computer banks so maybe I can remember it the next time I need it," she explained.

  • Legislators' utility bills shut down

     

  • Districts offer farmers protection

    HILLSVILLE  —  Ag and forestal districts in Wythe County have managed to hold off town annexations and a transmission power line in the 30 years they’ve existed, said one participant.
    Dairy farmer Eric Crowgey spoke to a roomful of about 40 people interested in learning about ag and forestal districts in Carroll County on Jan. 6. He shared history, insight and tips about the voluntary protection for rural land in Wythe County.

  • Carroll cuts farm tax in half

    HILLSVILLE — Planting the seeds of tax cuts for farmers, the Carroll supervisors talked Jan. 13 about doing away with a levy on agricultural equipment in its next budget year.
    Supervisor Andy Jackson brought up the idea for discussion near the end of an eventful January meeting, and his fellow board members felt they could phase the idea in.
    Farming has outlasted other industries that have come and gone, Jackson said. Farming has a continuing, and increasingly diversified, presence in Carroll.

  • Wild about Wildwood

    HILLSVILLE — Securing a $3.8 million grant from the Virginia Tobacco Commission for the planned business and commerce park at Interstate 77 Exit 19 means there’s a lot of state representatives who are “wild about Wildwood,” Carroll officials indicated in reacting to the news at a Jan. 13 meeting.

  • Group wants to unplug law that allows excessive rate hikes

    Changes to state regulation in 2007 of electric utilities led to jolting price increases, but state officials want to plug fairness for customers back into the oversight process.
    Del. Ward Armstrong (D-Henry County), who represents part of Carroll County, led the charge of the Virginia Electric Utility Regulatory Work Group to study what went wrong after utilities sent rates surging.

  • Website access to require subscription

     

    Beginning Wednesday Jan. 26, The Gazette’s website at www.galaxgazette.com will become a subscription-only news and information site.
    We’ll offer complete access for our subscribers to all of the news and features currently in our print product, plus a number of online-only features, such as videos, photo slideshows, blogs, polls, reader interaction and more.

  • Electricity rate hikes expected

    The new president of Appalachian Power Co. told a group of regional leaders recently that while electricity rates have recently dipped, rate increases are on the horizon as the utility faces the costs of meeting environmental regulations.
    Charles Patton, who was named president and chief operating officer in the summer, said Appalachian will file a new rate application with the State Corporation Commission by March 31 but it was too soon to discuss details.