.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Business

  • Wildwood could get $3.8 million

    HILLSVILLE —  Work at Wildwood may gain momentum with a request for a grant before the Virginia Tobacco Commission receiving support in two preliminary reviews.
    Ken McFadyen of the Blue Ridge Crossroads Economic Development Authority appeared before the county board at its regular December meeting, giving updates on economic development efforts. He noted that a sizable grant now for site development has the backing both of the tobacco commission staff and the Special Projects Commission.

  • Guardian to add 40 jobs

    Guardian Industries will invest $2.1 million to expand operations at its Consolidated Glass & Mirror facility in the Galax, which will create 40 new jobs through its new solar energy product line, announced Gov. Bob McDonnell on Wednesday.
    The Galax plant currently provides 234 jobs. Equipment is expected to be installed by spring, and new workers will be in place by next August.
    Greg Adkins, human resource manager for the plant, said the Galax facility competed with plants in Iowa and California to bring in the new product line.

  • Airport commission turns to localities for funding

    The Twin County Airport Commission is looking to localities to help fund capital improvement projects over the next few years in order to make the airport in Carroll County an economic development tool, said Tom Jones, chair of the commission.

  • A painful price point for drivers

    Never before have motorists paid $3 for a gallon of gasoline at Christmastime.
    Unless things change, that could soon happen across the nation, according to the American Automobile Association’s “Daily Fuel Gauge Report.”

  • Galax defies tourism's downward trend

    U.S. tourists visiting Virginia spent $17.7 billion in 2009, a 7.9 percent drop from the prior year, according to state figures released last week.
    But the Galax reversed that trend, with the city seeing a 10.4 percent increase in traveller spending last year.
    Tourists spent more than $13 million in Galax last year, according to the Virginia Tourism Corp. That spending includes gas, food, lodging, shopping, entertainment, public transportation and admission to local events and attractions.

  • Duties upheld on imported Chinese furniture

    WASHINGTON, D.C. — A decision by the U.S. International Trade Commission to maintain duties on Chinese furniture imports will help combat China’s unfair trade practices, Virginia’s U.S. Sen. James Webb said this week.
    In testimony submitted to the commission review hearing in October, Webb warned that “dumping” practices are putting Virginia manufacturers on “a knife’s edge” and that failure to counter them could lead to “the point where the furniture industry in Virginia is only history.”

  • John Vaughan receives AHFA award

    HIGH POINT, N.C. — John Bassett Vaughan — former chairman, CEO and president of Galax-based Vaughan Furniture Company — received the American Home Furnishings Alliance's prestigious Distinguished Service Award during the group's 2010 annual meeting at the Sanctuary on Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale, Ariz., on Nov. 12.

    Vaughan, who also served as chairman and CEO of Webb Furniture Enterprises in Galax, was lauded as a "civic-minded industrialist." 

  • Wired Road to expand in Galax

     The Wired Road will begin advertising for bids soon as it seeks a construction company to lay broadband fiber from the Vaughan Furniture offices on Glendale Road east to an industrial park at Jack Guynn Drive then down Cranberry Road and over U.S. 58 to the Crossroads Institute.

  • Lottery business off its game

     CANA — Lottery revenues may have declined in the competition for dollars with North Carolina, but one Cana store continues to lead Virginia in sales.

    Cana Exxon Stop remains a destination for scratch-off and Cash 5 tickets from the Virginia Lottery, despite the Tarheels commencing their own state-sponsored games of chance about five years ago.

  • Hodges Rides Again

     “You're listening to NightRide USA. Here to take you safely through the night,” radio host Bruce Hodges would announce on his radio show, formerly on 98.1 WBRF FM. 

    For the past eight years, between 11:06 p.m. and 6 a.m. on weekdays, listeners could call in to Hodges and request a song of inspiration and encouragement or share stories of distress and hope.

    The show is non-political, but patriotic. It's not religious, but spiritual.