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Today's Features

  • HILLSVILLE — The Carroll County Fair will once again feature fun for the whole family, but at a new venue — for the first time, the event will be held at the new fairgrounds at the Southwest Virginia Farmers' Market.

    The fair will display farming activities, games, a beauty pageant, music, food, amusements and much more.

    The fair schedule includes:

    • Wednesday — preview night with no admission charge.

  • Registration for the Galax Old Fiddlers’ Convention has increased for the second year in a row, rising from 1,817 last year to 1,905.

    Until 2008, the convention had been experiencing a five-year slump.

    The upward trend is encouraging to the Galax Moose Lodge #733, organizers of the 74-year-old event.

    A total of 88 more contestants signed up, compared to an increase of 52 contestants last year.

    Registrations for 2007 were down 130 from the previous year.

  • Though local Kevin Fore never got to meet local old-time music legend Kyle Creed, who passed away in 1982, the banjo player forever changed Fore's life.

    To Fore, Creed was his hero and he would have given anything to meet him. In fact, Creed is the reason Fore got interested in the banjo and the reason he started hand-making some of his own instruments using the Kyle Creed method.

  • The North Carolina Council, in honor of Hosteling International's 75th anniversary in the United States and 100th year worldwide, recognized local Alex Koji of Galax at the Rex Theater on June 7 with music from the Kitchen Band, and friends and visitors from all over the country.

    They also declared June 7, 2009 as Alex Koji Day.

    Hosteling International has nearly 4,000 hostels in more than 60 countries worldwide, including more than 100 hostels here in the United States. Alex and his wife Lois have operated the Blue Ridge Hostel near Galax for 22 years.

  • HILLSVILLE — Organ donors save lives, as in the case of Michael Henry, who donated a kidney to his father, Bob.

    Hillsville resident and businessman Bob Henry saw the quality of life deteriorate as his health declined, starting with a bout of cancer that affected his kidney.

    In 2005, he had half the kidney removed, which took care of the cancer problem. But after that, Henry’s kidney functions diminished.

    That led to dialysis, and he underwent surgery on his arm to prepare him for receiving the treatments. A lump over his elbow still looks purple.

  • It was one of the most important events of Tino Sauter's life, and he was about to miss it.

    On Jan. 17, Tino, his dad Bob and brother Jaisen — all of Galax — headed to Charlotte, N.C., where the 15-year-old ballet dancer was to audition for the prestigious Joffrey Ballet of New York City.

    But when their car broke down a mile away from the audition venue and only a few minutes before he was to perform, Tino thought he would never make it.

    “This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and I was going to miss it,” he thought.

  • Katherine Stone was known as the “flag lady of Mount Dora.”

    That's the name people gave her when she lived in Florida, after many years of adorning her yard with thousands of American flags and her front porch with red, white and blue for Independence Day and any other patriotic holiday.

    Now, they've brought their tradition to their new home on Calhoun Street in downtown Galax.

  • Guy Russell gave his first pint of blood 52 years ago, when his uncle suffered injuries from a car accident.

    Soon after, the Galax resident made a wonderful habit and legacy of donating blood.

    When Russell worked at a local factory, he recalls that his boss would come to each person and ask them to give blood for the American Red Cross — all on the company’s time.

  • It made perfect sense that this year's pet show at the Galax Public Library was dedicated to the late Dr. Don Fincher, a beloved Galax veterinarian who passed away last month.

    Fincher, as you'd expect, loved animals and caring for their well-being. He also loved books, making the site of the pet show the ideal venue.

    The critter competition was once an annual feature of the library's summer reading program, but it hadn't been held for a few years. Children's librarian Carlene Poole brought it back to coincide with the last summer program under her direction.

  • INDEPENDENCE — The Confederate statue that guarded the south lawn of the Historic 1908 Courthouse in Independence for nearly a century has been taken down — but only temporarily.

    Erected in 1911, the statue has never before been removed.

    Just before noon on July 7, a crane removed the statue from its perch for the first time.

    For the past three years, the Historic 1908 Courthouse Foundation has been raising money to restore the statue.