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Today's Features

  • Conservationists cringed two years ago when the state considered building a prison along the New River in the Cox’s Chapel community of Grayson County.

    Now they can celebrate the fact that the riverfront property has been protected from future development.

  • Chestnut Creek School of the Arts is accepting reservations through Friday for area artisans wishing to participate in instructor orientation.

    All area musicians, artists and crafts people are invited to participate on Jan. 22 from 5-9 p.m. at Crossroads Institute on East Stuart Drive in Galax.

  • The three lead dancers in the upcoming fairy tale production “The Nutcracker” may all still be in high school, but their talent as experienced dancers would make the audience think otherwise.

    Performances of “The Nutcracker” by the Conservatory of Dance & Theatre will be held Saturday at 6 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. at Galax High School.

    To Taylor Edwards, Tino Sauter and Beth Galyean, “The Nutcracker” is more than just a dance recital. It is part of their way of life.

  • As Charles and Ruth Frangos walk through their home, Charles reaches over to turn on the light switch embraced by a squirrel cover and points out a squirrelly museum of figurines.

    In a collection worth thousands of dollars, taxidermy squirrels deck the walls, crystal figurines stack the shelves of a curio cabinet, squirrel pictures adorn the walls of the kitchen and more than 300 stuffed, ceramic, porcelain and plastic squirrels cram the two six-foot bookshelves in the living room.

  • The Rooftop of Virginia Craft Shop in downtown Galax was stuffed wall to wall on Monday with handmade items like quilts, baby clothes, toys and dolls, crocheted items, Christmas ornaments, homemade soaps, hand-carved decoys, furniture, pottery, jams, pickles, CDs and books — illustrating the diverse talents of local artisans.

    With a little bit of everything to offer, the only thing missing was shoppers.

  • INDEPENDENCE — North Carolina has one, as do most states in America — but not Virginia.

    A Grayson County woman hopes to change that with her composition.

    For nearly 60 years, Virginia's state song was “Carry Me Back to Ol' Virginny.”

    Today, the song's title of official state song has been taken away and a contest to find a new song has been suspended.

  • Instructor Linda Donnell teaches “Shakespeare for Children” at the Conservatory of Dance & Theatre in downtown Galax. For an hour each week for a month, children ages 8 to 12 learn the many aspects of Shakespearean theatre. In the interactive class, they learned dances of the Elizabethan Era, about sonnets, received voice training and played theatre games.

    A dancer and actor, Donnell has trained in Shakespeare, acting, voice, movement and mime under British Professor Emeritus James Dodding, along with her many other achievements and education.

  • COOKEVILLE, Tenn. — Soon after clogging team Rhythm 'N' Motion stepped down off the Grand Ole Opry stage Oct. 10, they earned an encore appearance by winning the America's Clogging Hall of Fame nationals against about 400 other competitors.

    The repeat champion team features four dancers who first practiced on stages in the Twin Counties — Melissa Pack, Christina Nobili, Dereck Galyean and Kody Hash.

  • HILLSVILLE — As an educator of at-risk students, Lisa Hurst believes she has to be a "risk taker" to get them involved in the learning process.

    Her successes in the Regional Alternative Education Center classroom have led to her being named Carroll County's Teacher of the Year.

    Members of the school board presented the award last Tuesday at their regular November meeting.

    Hurst, who earned a bachelor of arts in English from High Point University in 1986, plans to complete her master's degree work in English education by next May.

  • Firefighters, ranging from fresh recruits to seasoned veterans gathered outside Vaughan-Guynn Funeral Home on Nov. 11 in their crisp blue dress uniforms and white gloves.

    They spoke quietly and huddled tightly amid dozens of fire engines lining the street.

    Each badge bore a black ribbon in remembrance of their lost brother.

    The Galax Volunteer Fire Department came together to pay tribute to one of its oldest and most influential members, Joe Crockett.