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Today's Features

  • DUGSPUR — A new Crooked Road partner has mounted up on Virginia's traditional music trail.

    Crooked Road co-founder Joe Wilson will visit the Kanawha Valley Arena, known for its equestrian pursuits, to present a banner celebrating its designation as an affiliated partner on the self-guided driving trail focusing on Virginia's musical heritage.

    The presentation will occur at 7 p.m. Saturday, prior to a performance by The Bolt Brothers, according to a Crooked Road press release.

  • INDEPENDENCE — Sharon Reeves, a teacher at the CATE Center, has been named the Grayson County school system’s teacher of the year for 2010.

    The announcement came May 4, during the annual reception to honor distinguished teachers from each of the 10 schools in the system.

    Stephen Cornett, director of instruction and assessment, complimented the teachers “for their caring attitudes and their strong commitment to give students the best education possible.”

    Cornett said teachers had to meet extensive criteria as part of the selection process.

  • The Arts Council is hosting a variety showcase of eight Twin County female performing arts groups at Galax High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Saturday.

    Groups include singing by the Yazoo Sisters, Highland Camerata Ensemble, Galax High School Girls Barbershop Quartet, and Earth Mama; music by Mountain Marimba and Blew Ridge Brass; and dances by the Conservatory of Dance and Bint El Samra

    Admission is free, donations appreciated.

  • HILLSVILLE — 1935 proved a busy year in the Twin Counties.

    Construction wrapped up on the Blue Ridge Parkway and tourists got to drive on the scenic national park road for the first time starting in the fall.

    Fiddlers gathered in a convention for the first time in Galax to play some old-time tunes.

    And, on May 15 of that year, 29 men who had served their country in the military mustered together to create the Grover King Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1115.

  • INDEPENDENCE — A veritable 'Who’s Who' of renewable energy speakers will be featured and a variety of earth friendly vendors will demonstrate energy saving, carbon footprint reducing products and services at Saturday’s 3rd Annual Independence Earth Day and "Save Green: Money and Energy" Expo at the 1908 Courthouse.

    The event is sponsored by Grayson Land Care and the Town of Independence Special Events Committee.

  • Local author and Eagle Scout Todd Shaw said Boy Scouts is a game with a purpose, where boys can learn life skills, have fun and carry on the values and principles throughout a lifetime.

  • With the 75th anniversary of the Blue Ridge Parkway just around the corner — and as many as 20,000 people expected to visit the area this year as part of the parkway's celebration — the Crossroads Institute will host a series of events, starting tomorrow, Thursday, to get locals in touch with the area's heritage.

  • Being a lineman means having a career where people look up to you, Eddie Reavis of TCR Management likes to say.

    Twenty years working with utility companies in the field has given Reavis a bird's eye perspective on the industry, and he knows there's a high demand for these kinds of skilled laborers.

    That led to the creation of TCR Management at the Crossroads Institute to start with the basics for groundsman training, the first step on the way to become a lineman.

    It's hard work, but good opportunities are available for those willing to tackle it.

  • Plans are underway for the Blue Ridge Parkway’s 75th anniversary weekend celebration during Sept. 10-12, marking the anniversary of construction on Sept. 11, 1935.

    The Blue Ridge Music Center (milepost 213), the Cumberland Knob Recreation Area (milepost 217), and neighboring communities of Fancy Gap, Hillsville, Fries, Independence and Galax will be among sites for this multi-day, multi-venue celebration.

    Included will be regional music, crafts, storytelling, children’s activities and foods from the Blue Ridge.

  • As a young boy growing up in Kentucky, local music legend Willard Gayheart, scraped up $3 to purchase his first guitar, and even though he didn't do much with it then, when he moved to Galax in 1962 he got hooked on learning bluegrass and old-time music.

    Gayheart, now a renowned musician and pencil artist, shared his story with a crowd at last Thursday's first Bluegrass Gravy & River Quilts event at the Crossroads Institute in Galax.