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Today's Features

  • HILLSVILLE — A Girl Scout working on her Gold Award recently launched a project to help victims of domestic violence at the Family Resource Center in Wytheville.

  • LAUREL FORK — Olde Mill has kicked its culinary offerings up a notch with Chef Ed Badgett heading up the kitchen.

    The golf course continues adding housing and an array of amenities as it transitions to a fully fledged resort community, and the vision for the place has captivated the chef.

    Not only does Badgett serve as chef and live onsite, he's taken the lead in blogging and tweeting about happenings and has even shown the new housing to clients. "I do as much as I can without sacrificing being in the kitchen."

  •  Watch for more graduation photos in Friday's edition of The Gazette on the Twin County Living page.

  • When the Rev. Ricardo Alvarado, pastor of the Hispanic congregation at First Baptist Church of Galax, visited a halfway house in Costa Rica in March, he saw something he didn't know existed in his own country — a poorly pieced-together structure made from whatever wood and metal could be found.

    The floors were dirt and there were wood-sided outhouses nearby.

    Members of First Baptist Church of Galax, Hillsville Christian Church, First Baptist Church of Hillsville and Cornerstone Community Church in Galax are coming together to fix that situation.

  • INDEPENDENCE — Few people in Grayson County remember when Sheriff Charles C. McKnight was shot and killed in the line of duty in 1933.

    There were no plaques that honored him, which concerned Sheriff Richard Vaughan.

    Several weeks ago, he started a project to remember the late sheriff and, after extensive research, a large bronze plaque bearing McKnight’s picture and the date he was killed now hangs in the front lobby of the Grayson County Courthouse.

  • A trucking company that employs more than 200 in the Twin Counties was named Twin County Regional Chamber of Commerce's Business of the Year on Saturday, during the chamber's annual awards banquet.

    Hill's Coal & Trucking began in the early 1960s in Fries, hauling coal and fertilizer, said Raquel Lyons, the chamber's executive board attorney, before presenting the trophy to co-owner James Hill.

    James and Gus Hill are the original founders of the business.

  • HILLSVILLE — An investigation by a Carroll deputy has ensured that one of his fellow officers will be properly remembered for his service.

    The name of Carroll Deputy Emery Mabry had been carved into the National Law Enforcement Officers' Memorial in Washington, D.C., with a description that didn't accurately tell the story of how he died in the line of duty.

    The deputy stopped a suspicious vehicle, soon after his watch ended on April 22, 1974.

  • HILLSVILLE — In order to become a centerpiece of the community for cultural and historical activities, the Carter Home Foundation needs more community involvement.

    The foundation that oversees the home associated with coal and railroad magnate George L. Carter holds non-profit status. A recent facelift has refreshed the exterior and the first two floors of the interior of the home originally built by Fielden Hale in 1845.

  • DUGSPUR — A new Crooked Road partner has mounted up on Virginia's traditional music trail.

    Crooked Road co-founder Joe Wilson will visit the Kanawha Valley Arena, known for its equestrian pursuits, to present a banner celebrating its designation as an affiliated partner on the self-guided driving trail focusing on Virginia's musical heritage.

    The presentation will occur at 7 p.m. Saturday, prior to a performance by The Bolt Brothers, according to a Crooked Road press release.

  • INDEPENDENCE — Sharon Reeves, a teacher at the CATE Center, has been named the Grayson County school system’s teacher of the year for 2010.

    The announcement came May 4, during the annual reception to honor distinguished teachers from each of the 10 schools in the system.

    Stephen Cornett, director of instruction and assessment, complimented the teachers “for their caring attitudes and their strong commitment to give students the best education possible.”

    Cornett said teachers had to meet extensive criteria as part of the selection process.