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Religion

  • Pastor's studies focus on spiritual healing

    The Rev. Dr. Helen Beasley of the Episcopal/Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd in Galax recently received her Doctor of Ministry degree from the Virginia Theological Seminary in Alexandria.
    With five years of difficult class work behind her, Beasley said she is excited to utilize what she learned to usher in a new level of spiritual healing within her church.
    Beasley was one of 17 graduates in this summer’s commencement ceremony, the highest number of students to graduate from the program at one time, according to the seminary’s newsletter.

  • Funding needed for prison chaplain

    INDEPENDENCE — Members of the recently established River North Ministry Council (RNMC) has made it their mission to install a prison chaplain at River North Correctional Facility by the day the first inmate arrives, but the biggest challenge facing the group is finding individuals and groups to pledge funding for the position.
    RNMC, including pastors and residents of the Twin Counties and surrounding areas, met Aug. 22 at Independence First United Methodist Church to elect an executive council and discuss other new developments.

  • Chaplain chosen, ministry forms at River North prison

    INDEPENDENCE — River North Correctional Facility is anticipated to provide a significant boost to local businesses and increase employment in Independence and Grayson County when it opens this fall, but another significant way it has already impacted the county is by unifying many area churches and religious groups with a common goal of ministering to inmates.

  • Praisin' in the Park gets 'Extreme' makeover

    Local churches are uniting to bring a four-night youth event back to Galax on July 21-24, this year with a focus on extreme sports and skateboarding.

  • Ministry is P.U.S.H.-ing in the right direction

    A Galax ministry is helping the elderly, the hungry and young men in need of life skills with a variety of innovative programs.

  • Chainbreakers imparts life lessons to young men

    Also included in P.U.S.H. Ministries’ list of programs is Chainbreakers, a series of classes specifically tailored to teach important life skills to young men in the community.

  • P.U.S.H. uses Biblical miracle as model for fighting hunger

    P.U.S.H. Ministries is looking to the community for help to fight hunger in our community with its “Feeding the 5,000” program.
    The ministry’s food bank helps provide food for more than 130 families each month.
    According to Pastor Jill Burcham, the program is named after a story in the Bible where Jesus miraculously feeds 5,000 of his followers by breaking apart five loaves of bread and two fish.

  • Local pastors planning prison ministry

    INDEPENDENCE ― A meeting is planned for June 6 to discuss plans to open a prison ministry at the new River North Correctional Center in Independence.
    According to reports, neither the Virginia Department of Corrections nor Chaplain Service Prison Ministry of Virginia has funds to place a chaplain at the prison.
    The Rev. Terri Gregory, pastor of the Independence United Methodist Church, said plans are to organize a “River North Ministry Council” made up of ministers and laypeople in the surrounding counties of Virginia and North Carolina.

  • Hillsville plans first Gospel Day event

    HILLSVILLE — Voices will be raised in praise at the first-ever Gospel Day June 1 in Jail House Square in Hillsville, a musical event meant to appeal to locals and visitors alike.
    David Young, Pipers Gap Ward representative on Hillsville Town Council, long wanted to stage a gospel music celebration to go along with the slate of beach bands that play the summer Downtown Celebrations.

  • Church for sale, any denominations accepted

    HILLSVILLE — There will be no revival for Fellowship Wesleyan Church. Instead, the facility will be sold after the pastor moves to New York.
    After Alan Page came to Hillsville in 2009, he tried to get the word out that the church was still pursuing its mission.
    Many didn’t even know the church continued to hold services. Despite erecting a new cross in front of church on Virginia Street, visible from U.S. 58, people still thought it had been shuttered.